Museum organizations http://temescalartscenter.org/ Fri, 30 Sep 2022 15:16:59 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://temescalartscenter.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-1.png Museum organizations http://temescalartscenter.org/ 32 32 Museum prepares to add PST to admission and memberships https://temescalartscenter.org/museum-prepares-to-add-pst-to-admission-and-memberships/ Fri, 30 Sep 2022 14:35:00 +0000 https://temescalartscenter.org/museum-prepares-to-add-pst-to-admission-and-memberships/ With a 6% price increase on many attractions on Saturday, thanks to changes to Saskatchewan’s provincial sales tax, the Western Development Museum in Saskatoon is bracing for a hike in admission and membership prices. Western Development Museum CEO Joan Kanigan said the raise is “just one of those things. “It’s definitely going to come with […]]]>

With a 6% price increase on many attractions on Saturday, thanks to changes to Saskatchewan’s provincial sales tax, the Western Development Museum in Saskatoon is bracing for a hike in admission and membership prices.

Western Development Museum CEO Joan Kanigan said the raise is “just one of those things.

“It’s definitely going to come with all the pressures of inflation anyway, and we’re just working on ways to be as accessible to our communities as possible.”

The increase is meant to impact admission and membership prices only, Kanigan said. The current adult admission price will drop from $12 to $12.69 on Saturday.

Admission and membership prices are already subject to GST charges.

“It will be an increase for our visitors, but that’s what we’ll have to do,” Kanigan said.

The CEO said the museum is working to sponsor more admissions and expand its community reach.

“Given how inflation is going, this will likely or could impact visitation,” Kanigan said. “We hope the impact will be minimal.”

The CEO said the museum is fortunate to work with the Bank of Montreal, which sponsors certain free-entry days during the year, allowing visitors free entry on those days.

The next free day is set for May 2023.

“We are looking for ways to reduce the impact and ensure the museum remains accessible to everyone in our communities,” Kanigan said.

She also pointed out that curriculum-based educational programs are not affected, as they are exempt from PST and GST due to the fact that they are school programs.

Kanigan said she believes the government imposing the tax is a move it deems necessary to manage the economy.

“They look at these taxes at all levels. It’s not just us; many other entertainment and tourism organizations are also affected,” Kanigan explained.

Despite the price hike, Kanigan said the museum is an amazing — and affordable — place for people to connect with their personal stories and the province’s history. Parents, children and grandparents can explore the exhibits together and foster a sense of Saskatchewan pride, she said.

“It’s an affordable family opportunity,” Kanigan said.

The CEO said a new exhibit will open Oct. 12 at the museum, following a partnership with Whitecap Dakota First Nation.

Kanigan said it would give guests insight into the history of the First Nations community and its shared history with the museum.

]]>
City Life Org – Play On Shakespeare Announces Fall/Winter/Spring Seasons https://temescalartscenter.org/city-life-org-play-on-shakespeare-announces-fall-winter-spring-seasons/ Wed, 28 Sep 2022 19:00:03 +0000 https://temescalartscenter.org/city-life-org-play-on-shakespeare-announces-fall-winter-spring-seasons/ Play on Shakespearethe non-profit organization dedicated to exploring the world of Shakespeare in performance through translation and adaptation, today announces its Fall 2022, Winter 2023 and Spring 2023 seasons. Fall 2022, winter 2023 and spring 2023 seasons: Building on Play On Shakespeare’s mission to enhance understanding of Shakespeare’s plays in performance, Play on podcasts bring […]]]>

Play on Shakespearethe non-profit organization dedicated to exploring the world of Shakespeare in performance through translation and adaptation, today announces its Fall 2022, Winter 2023 and Spring 2023 seasons.

Fall 2022, winter 2023 and spring 2023 seasons:

Building on Play On Shakespeare’s mission to enhance understanding of Shakespeare’s plays in performance, Play on podcasts bring timeless tales directly to modern audiences. The series – presented by Next Chapter Podcasts in partnership with Play On Shakespeare – is out Macbeth, Pericles, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Coriolanus, King Lear, twelfth night and Henry V over the past year and a half. On October 14, Play On Podcasts will be released measure for measure (translation by Aditi Brennan Kapil; direction by Jessie Austrian) featuring New York’s award-winning Fiasco Theater ensemble.

The Winter’s Tale (translation by Tracy Young) will follow in December. Additional titles will be announced in early 2023.

Listen now.

Coriolanus

Actors’ Shakespeare Project

Translated by: Sean San Jose

Directed by: Melisa Pereyra

Dates: March 29 – April 23, 2023

In the spring of 2023, Actors’ Shakespeare Project will explore Shakespeare’s political thriller, Coriolanus, translated by Sean San José. This production will offer insight into the impact of violence and political power on marginalized populations and delve into the nuances of advocacy.

Tickets and more information here.

Romeo and Juliet

Two River Theater Company and NAATCO

Translated by: Hansol Jung

Directed by: Hansol Jung and Dustin Wills
Dates: April 8 to 30, 2023

In partnership with Two River Theater Company, NAATCO will produce an all-Asian American production of Romeo and Juliet, translated by Hansol Jung. Hear classic tragicomedy in a new way as Jung’s language elevates Shakespeare’s austere humor. Last spring, Two River Theater presented Romeo and Juliet as part of their Benefit Reading Series, under the direction of Chay Yew. After the series of readings, we are now delighted to see Romeo and Juliet in full production by NAATCO this spring.

Tickets and more information here.

Details of another collaborative production, scheduled for summer 2023, will be announced shortly.

ACMRS Press [Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies] continues to publish Play On Shakespeare translations in print. All 39 titles will be released over the next few years.

LEARN MORE ABOUT PLAYING ON SHAKESPEARE:

Play On Shakespeare is a non-profit corporation that promotes and creates contemporary modern translations of Shakespeare’s plays. Since its inception in 2015, Play On has commissioned dozens of contemporary playwrights and translators to translate 39 Shakespearean plays into modern English, with the majority of commissions led by BIPOC and female playwrights. Far from being an exercise in paraphrase, each playwright was tasked with matching Shakespeare’s linguistic rigor to the approach to the text, preserving rhyme, rhythm, metaphor, meter, imagery, symbolism, the rhetoric and structure that make Shakespeare’s plays engaging and accessible to audiences today. Play On partners with artists and organizations around the world to offer and advocate for these translations through a variety of channels, including theater productions, podcasts, publications, and films. For more information, visit playonshakespeare.org. Play On Shakespeare is made possible through the generous support of The Hitz Foundation.

ABOUT PLAY ON SHAKESPEARE SPONSOR, THE HITZ FOUNDATION:

The Hitz Foundation has projects in science, the arts and the environment around the world. In addition to Play On Shakespeare and Play On Podcasts, the foundation also supports several archaeological projects in northern Guatemala and funded the largest LiDAR mapping ever undertaken for archaeological research to support these projects (discovery of 60,000 new Mayan structures ). The foundation funds Global Digital Heritage which captures state-of-the-art 3D models of museum collections and heritage sites and shares them with the world at no cost. The foundation also supports several environmental projects, including the Maasai Wilderness Conservation Trust, which protects East African ecosystems and biodiversity through conservation efforts that directly benefit Maasai wildlife, nature and communities. local.

Play on Shakespeare: Official site / instagram / Twitter / Facebook

]]>
Lloyd Library’s ‘Visions of Nature’ exhibition aims to raise awareness of regional conservation efforts | Visual arts | Cincinnati https://temescalartscenter.org/lloyd-librarys-visions-of-nature-exhibition-aims-to-raise-awareness-of-regional-conservation-efforts-visual-arts-cincinnati/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 21:29:06 +0000 https://temescalartscenter.org/lloyd-librarys-visions-of-nature-exhibition-aims-to-raise-awareness-of-regional-conservation-efforts-visual-arts-cincinnati/ Click to enlarge Photo: Rick Conner A photograph by Cincinnati photographer Rick Conner, which appears in the Lloyd Library exhibit Visions of nature through time and space. Past meets present at Lloyd Library and Museum’s latest exhibition Visions of nature through time and space. Admire the natural wonder of a bumblebee perched on a flower, […]]]>
Click to enlarge

Photo: Rick Conner

A photograph by Cincinnati photographer Rick Conner, which appears in the Lloyd Library exhibit Visions of nature through time and space.

Past meets present at Lloyd Library and Museum’s latest exhibition Visions of nature through time and space.

Admire the natural wonder of a bumblebee perched on a flower, the milky light reflecting off a stream, a sun-dusted dandelion and more captured by local photographers Rick Conner and TJ Vissing at The Nature Conservancy in Ohio .

Their work will be presented from September 30 to November 31. 19 as part of the 2022 FotoFocus biennial alongside historic images taken by library co-founder Curtis Gates Lloyd, who traveled the world collecting books and plant specimens from the 1890s through the 1920s. Abroad, Lloyd has photographed plants in their natural habitats, including Samoa, Mexico, the Caribbean Islands, Italy and Egypt. Despite his worldly efforts, Lloyd also captured life near his home in Cincinnati and on his farm in Crittenden, Kentucky.

“Lloyd Library is just a treasure, isn’t it? There is so much history and information,” says Vissing CityBeat. “And what we do, I have to say, is a nod to the excellence that they exude themselves.”

Vissing goes on to explain that their piece of the show ultimately draws attention to conservation work. Visions of nature is similar to another of their projects, A year on the razor’s edge. Conner, who was an active member of The Nature Conservancy’s board of trustees and is now a life trustee, said the latest initiative aims to raise awareness of the conservation work being done in Adams County, Ohio. , on the edge of the Appalachian Preserve. There was a first show in 2018 at the Lloyd; the exhibit can now be viewed at the Cincinnati Museum Center.

“There are such beautiful and spectacular places in Ohio that people just don’t know about. And, for me, photography is a great way to capture the beauty of those places,” Conner says. connection to photography and the wonderful sense of place it provides, my personal hope is that it will make people aware of connecting to these places, and then turn that connection into support.”

Vissing and Conner chose photographs for Visions of nature on the theme “threads of light”. Vissing recalls an instance where he was standing in the river with sunlight shining on the water; there he took pictures using a longer exposure time. He realized that he had captured the sunlight by creating a scribble motion on the water. He refers to this unique pattern as a solar signature.

“The hope for me is that people see a picture like this and realize what’s going on. And maybe one day look for it themselves and find it,” Vissing says. [create the scribbling motion] when you squint and sit by a river in the sun and then watch what the sun is doing on the surface of the water.

Click to enlarge A photograph by Cincinnati photographer TJ Vissing, which appears in the Lloyd Library's exhibit Visions of Nature across Time and Place.  - Photo: TJ Vissing

Photo: TJ Vissing

A photograph by Cincinnati photographer TJ Vissing, which appears in the Lloyd Library exhibit Visions of nature through time and space.

Conner says he’s had similar experiences in motion capture. Many of his photographs also use a long exposure but emphasize the flow and churning of water.

“A long exposure really reveals how the water is moving in ways you really wouldn’t expect, and then it catches the light,” says Conner. “So some of my images reflect that. But, to me, it was just a really intriguing thing that’s almost mysterious and unveiled through the action of taking these photos.

The sixth annual FotoFocus Biennial features more than 100 projects at sites in Greater Cincinnati, Dayton and Columbus. All participating projects relate to the theme of World recordwhich aims both to consider the photographic archives of life on Earth while exploring the impact of humanity on nature.

Guests can expect several events throughout the exhibition, including an artist talk with Conner and Vissing on Wednesday, November 9 at 7 p.m.

Visions of nature opens September 30 and runs through November 19 at the Lloyd Library and Museum, 917 Plum St., Downtown. Information: lloydlibrary.org.

Stay connected with CityBeat. Subscribe to our newsletters and follow us on Facebook, instagram, Twitter, Google News, Apple News and Reddit.

Send CityBeat a news or tip or submit calendar event.

]]> 5th Annual Hangar Bash at the Lone Star Flight Museum https://temescalartscenter.org/5th-annual-hangar-bash-at-the-lone-star-flight-museum/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 17:17:44 +0000 https://temescalartscenter.org/5th-annual-hangar-bash-at-the-lone-star-flight-museum/ Take flight back from the Hangar Bash at LSFM | Courtesy of Lone Star Aviation Museum Party among the planes with barbecue plates, craft beers, live music and more at 5th Annual Hangar Bash at the Lone Star Flight Museum on Saturday October 15, 2022. Back after a break in 2021, Annual Lone Star Flight […]]]>

Take flight back from the Hangar Bash at LSFM | Courtesy of Lone Star Aviation Museum

Party among the planes with barbecue plates, craft beers, live music and more at 5th Annual Hangar Bash at the Lone Star Flight Museum on Saturday October 15, 2022.

Back after a break in 2021, Annual Lone Star Flight Museum Hangar Bash takes flight once again, offering an evening of award-winning barbecue, delicious craft beers, airplane tours, live music and more.

The night begins with smoky delights from LoneStar Cowboy Cookers, accompanied by craft beers from Saint Arnold and Southern Star Brewing Co., plus wine and whiskey tastings.

Hard Luck Revival brings the tunes with crowd-favorite covers and country classics, and you can stroll through the hangar to find games, major raffle prizes like plane tickets, a silent auction and prizes. guided tours of some of the museum’s featured aircraft.

The 5th annual fundraiser helps fund Lone Star’s signature programming, field trips, community events and the museum’s mission to help create wonder and excitement for aviation.

Order tickets or find out more.

Sample Saint Arnold and Southern Star craft beer at LSFM’s Hangar Bash | Courtesy of Lone Star Aviation Museum

About the Lone Star Aviation Museum

Lone Star Aviation Museum aims to be a world-class educational museum that provides visitors with an understanding of the past and inspiration for the future.

Since opening a state-of-the-art, $38 million facility at Houston’s Ellington Airport in 2017, Lone Star Aviation Museum maintained its mission to preserve, educate and inspire with informative exhibits and ongoing activities that bring aviation to life.

The 130,000 square foot facility is home to the Texas Aviation Hall of Fame, a million dollar aviation learning center, dynamic interactive exhibits and a renowned collection of historic aircraft including B-17s , B-25, DC-3, P-47 and Stearman among many others.

Learn about the Lone Star Aviation Museum.

Try your luck at raffle prizes like free Warbird rides | Courtesy of Lone Star Aviation Museum

5th Annual Hangar Bash at the Lone Star Flight Museum

LSFM Offers BBQ, Beer and More at 5th Annual Hangar Bash | Courtesy of Lone Star Aviation Museum

This article was sponsored by the event organizer. In accordance with our Advertising and Sponsorship Policy, we only accept sponsored content from organizations that meet our editorial standards and genuinely present an activity, event, resource or destination of value to residents and visitors of the greater Houston area. Ad revenue helps support 365 Things to Do in Houston and our contributors, allowing us to expand our coverage of activities and events in the Houston area. Learn more about promoting your event or business.

]]>
The Recorder – ‘Vintage Days’ all weekend in Greenfield https://temescalartscenter.org/the-recorder-vintage-days-all-weekend-in-greenfield/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 18:41:18 +0000 https://temescalartscenter.org/the-recorder-vintage-days-all-weekend-in-greenfield/ GREENFIELD – In an effort to showcase the town’s ‘vintage vibe’, local authorities are teaming up with the Greenfield Business Association to organize the first Vintage Days. “Vintage Days celebrates our city’s rich industrial history, its courage and its many local businesses that embody vintage,” said Mayor RoxannWedegartner. “We hope this weekend will be fun […]]]>

GREENFIELD – In an effort to showcase the town’s ‘vintage vibe’, local authorities are teaming up with the Greenfield Business Association to organize the first Vintage Days.

“Vintage Days celebrates our city’s rich industrial history, its courage and its many local businesses that embody vintage,” said Mayor RoxannWedegartner. “We hope this weekend will be fun for all involved, a boon for the business community and a great launch for an annual event.”

The three-day event kicks off Friday with a classic car show in Court Square at 4:30 p.m., sales on downtown sidewalks and the opening of The Goods, a new pop-up store at 357 Main St., featuring The Rainbow Rack.

“I can’t wait to be there,” said ACS coordinator Rachel Roberts. “It’s a really eclectic mix, showcasing those vintage vendors as well as Greenfield’s history.”

Roberts said the idea for the event, for which she is a consultant, belongs to the mayor.

“She was noticing that there was a lot of vintage space along Main Street … and the whole kind of vintage vibe around Franklin County,” Roberts said. “With me as a consultant, we made the connection between the city and the GBA.”

She said there will be trolley rides every hour from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., a parade of vintage tractors and a barbecue fundraiser at 11 a.m. for the new fire station museum. firefighters.

“I always try to include different organizations around town … to involve them in the things that we do,” Roberts said. “I feel like the GBA and the city — we’re working together for the good of the community. I was talking to people at the fire station and… then I read the paper about some things about the museum and the funding and the craziness that was going on… I felt like it was a way to help .

Roberts was referring to the fire station’s new budget shortfall after receiving offers last month.

Captain Alex Cooley said the firefighters were grateful for the fundraiser and delighted to be part of Vintage Days.

“We hope to make this part of a fun event for everyone,” Cooley said.

He said the museum will help preserve and promote the history of the fire department.

“We owe a lot to the firefighters who came before us,” Cooley said. “And it’s an opportunity to both preserve and learn from what happened in the past and to honor that history.”

Roberts said she hopes the community is as excited as she is to enjoy downtown this weekend.

“I think people are thrilled that people are wandering the streets again,” she said. “It really is an opportunity for us to create an annual event to really celebrate Greenfield’s roots as well as who we are (today).”

Journalist Mary Byrne can be reached at mbyrne@recorder.com or 413-930-4429. Twitter: @MaryEByrne.

Greenfield Vintage Days Schedule

Friday September 23

■4:30 to 6:30 p.m.: Classic Car Show – Place de la Cour

■Downtown sidewalk sale

■ Official opening of Goods, 357 Main St.

Saturday September 24

■9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. – Historic tram rides

■Parade of vintage tractors from the Franklin County Fairgrounds to Court Square, with a prize for the best in display, from 10:00 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. and back to the fairgrounds from 12:30 p.m.

■10 a.m. to 4 p.m.: “Greenfield History Pop-up” with exhibits from the Greenfield Historical Commission and Greenfield Historical Society and flax spinning demonstrations with Historic Deerfield and blacksmithing by Pierce Street Ironworks on the Common

■10 a.m. to 7 p.m.: Open house at the Museum of Our Industrial Heritage on Mead Street

■2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.: Review of books and articles with Steve Finer in the “Antique Tenthouse” on Court Square

Sunday September 25

■11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.: Fundraising barbecue for the new fire station museum hosted by the Greenfield Fire Department with vendors, music, a fire truck and safety exhibits

■1:30-3:00 p.m.: Famous bartender at Hawks & Reed with vintage drink specials

■3 p.m. to 6 p.m.: Swing dancing in Court Square with the O-Tones hosted by Hawks & Reed

A full list of Vintage Days events can be found on the city’s recently relaunched travel and tourism website, https://visitgreenfieldma.com/.

]]>
It’s not just Nick Saban’s birthday https://temescalartscenter.org/its-not-just-nick-sabans-birthday/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 02:05:57 +0000 https://temescalartscenter.org/its-not-just-nick-sabans-birthday/ October 31 isn’t just Nick Saban’s birthday in Tuscaloosa. It’s also Halloween. While the temperature may still be in the 90s and the University of Alabama football coach is a few weeks away from turning 71, Halloween events are about to kick off. The Horror Tuscaloosa, a haunted house, begins on September 30, with more […]]]>

October 31 isn’t just Nick Saban’s birthday in Tuscaloosa. It’s also Halloween.

While the temperature may still be in the 90s and the University of Alabama football coach is a few weeks away from turning 71, Halloween events are about to kick off. The Horror Tuscaloosa, a haunted house, begins on September 30, with more events taking place throughout October.

This year’s Halloween highlights in the Tuscaloosa area will also include a pumpkin patch, ghost hunting event at the Drish House, witches on bikes, the town’s Tech or Treat party and an interactive screening of “The Rocky Horror Picture Show” at the Bama Theater.

Attention costume shoppers: Spirit Halloween is at 1825 McFarland Boulevard North, Suite 150, Northridge Center Plaza this year. Two other stores that weren’t open last year but might be of interest to Halloween shoppers are Party Wow at 2610 McFarland Blvd. E in the former Stein Mart location at McFarland Plaza and Party City at 1800 McFarland Blvd. E in the former Nike Factory Store location in Midtown Village.

Also of note for ghosts, goblins, monsters, witches, wizards and zombies everywhere: Halloween falls on a Monday this year.

Here’s a look at Halloween and fall-related events this year around T-Town:

Child-friendly events

The Tuscaloosa Barnyard, a children’s farm at 11453 Turner Bridge Road, will hold its annual pumpkin patch beginning the last week of September and will continue through the second week of November. The fall-themed event will also include wagon rides, pillow hopping, a petting zoo, cow train, pony rides and other hands-on activities. Admission is $12. The Tuscaloosa Barnyard will be open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays for the pumpkin patch. For more information, visit www.tuscaloosbarnyard.com.

Fall on the Farm, scheduled for 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on October 1, will include a craft festival and pumpkin patch at Wilderwood Farm, 12611 Coyote Trail, Ralph. Admission is $7; children 1 year and under are admitted free. The festival includes craft vendors, a hay walk, a bouncy house, farm animals, craft demonstrations, farm crafts and farm games. Supplement for pumpkins and horse or pony rides. Email wilderwoodfarm@gmail.com. www.wilderwoodfarm.com.

The T-Town Witches Ride, sponsored by Tuscaloosa Arch, will be held from 3-6 p.m. on October 16 at Government Plaza, 2106 Sixth St. The event will feature attendees dressed as witches costumes and riding decorated bicycles through the streets of Tuscaloosa to raise funds for the Arc , an organization that helps people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The ride starts at 5 p.m. and the cost of admission is $25. Spectators are welcome. For more information, call 205-556-4900.

The Children’s Hands-on Museum will host a Carnival Spooktacular from 5-8 p.m. on October 20. There will be games with prizes, a costume contest, a haunted hallway and DJ Wade and the Monster Masquerade. Armbands for unlimited play are $15. The museum is located at 2213 University Blvd. For more information, visit www.chomonline.org.

The City of Tuscaloosa’s sixth annual Tech or Treat event will take place from 6-8 p.m. on October 25, with free admission for all ages, at the Innovation and Discovery Gateway Center in Alberta, 2614 University Blvd. E. Similar to Trunk-or-Treat, Tech-or-Treat lets costumed kids go from table to table collecting candy while being introduced to science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) activities through interactions with municipal services and community organizations. .

Midtown Village will host Harvest Jam from 5:30-8:30 p.m. on October 28 on the Mall Green, 1800 McFarland Blvd. The event will include live music, a farmer’s market, a pumpkin patch and a craft beer tasting. Some proceeds from the craft beer tasting and pumpkin patch will benefit child abuse prevention services. Admission to the Harvest Jam is $5 and tickets are available at eventbrite.com.

Skate-O-Ween will take place at 2 p.m. on October 30, with games and prizes, at Super Skate, 5900 McFarland Blvd. E.

A free Halloween carnival sponsored by the Tuscaloosa Police Department is scheduled from 6-8 p.m. on October 31 at Snow Hinton Park, 1000 Hargrove Road E. Children are invited to make candy with TPD and the carnival will include candies, games and food trucks.

haunted houses

The Horror Tuscaloosa will be offering two themed experiences from September 30 through October 31 at its haunted house, 5477 Skyland Blvd. E., Cottondale. Tickets of $25 or more and entries each evening will be limited. Hours will be 7 p.m. to midnight on Fridays and Saturdays, September 30 through October 30. Oct. 29 and 7-10 p.m. on Oct. 20, 27, 30 and 31. www.thehorrortuscaloosa.com. Jobs are also available for crew and customer service positions; see www.thehorrortuscaloosa.com/jobs.

The Southern Ghost Girls will be hosting an interactive ghost hunting event beginning at 7 p.m. on October 8 at the historic Drish House in Tuscaloosa, 2300 17e Admission to St. is $50. For more information, visit https://southernhostgirls.com/events.

For adults

The 15the The annual screening of the “Rocky Horror Picture Show” is scheduled for October 29. The Pink Box Burlesque presents the 1975 horror/musical film at 8 p.m. at the Bama Theater, 600 Greensboro Ave. Accessory bags will be available while supplies last. Doors open at 7 p.m., the costume contest is at 8 p.m., and the movie begins at 8:30 p.m. Tickets are $20 in advance and $25 at the door. The event is for people aged 21 and over. To learn more, see www.pinkboxburlesque.com.

]]>
Smyrna Centennial Commemoration at the Illinois Holocaust Museum https://temescalartscenter.org/smyrna-centennial-commemoration-at-the-illinois-holocaust-museum/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 10:07:43 +0000 https://temescalartscenter.org/smyrna-centennial-commemoration-at-the-illinois-holocaust-museum/ SKOKIE, IL – The Smyrna Centennial Remembrance Conference 1922-2022 was held in person at the Illinois Holocaust Museum and Education Center in Skokie and via Zoom online on September 18. The Illinois Holocaust Museum and the Asia Minor and Pontos Hellenic Research Center (AMPHRC) offered an afternoon of discussion and presentations by renowned scholars and […]]]>

SKOKIE, IL – The Smyrna Centennial Remembrance Conference 1922-2022 was held in person at the Illinois Holocaust Museum and Education Center in Skokie and via Zoom online on September 18. The Illinois Holocaust Museum and the Asia Minor and Pontos Hellenic Research Center (AMPHRC) offered an afternoon of discussion and presentations by renowned scholars and educators as they addressed one of the most tragic and tragic events milestones in modern Greek history.

Titled The Great Fire of Smyrna, the 100th Anniversary Commemoration of the Genocide of the Greeks in Asia Minor, the event featured insights from distinguished speakers as well as eyewitness testimonies in a video clip from the documentary film produced by AMPHRC Lethal Nationalism and in statements read by descendants of survivors of the Catastrophe.

Speakers included: George Shirinian, author and executive director of the Zoryan Institute; Dr. Constantine Hatzidimitriou, adjunct assistant professor at St. John’s University and the City University of New York; Dr. Paul Bartrop, Professor Emeritus, Florida Gulf Coast University; and Kelley Szany, senior vice president of education and exhibits, Illinois Holocaust Museum and co-chair, Illinois Holocaust & Genocide Commission.

Dr. Constantine Hatzidimitriou, Adjunct Assistant Professor at St. John’s University and City University of New York. Photo: TNH Staff

In his presentation, Shirinian highlighted the history of cosmopolitan Smyrna before the disaster, the prosperity, diversity and tolerance that made it a “jewel” and so different from other cities, but also a target for hardline Turkish nationalists. . He noted that we must “never forget this trauma for the Greek and Armenian people.”

Dr Hatzidimitriou spoke movingly as his mother and family survived the 1922 Smyrna fire, the ‘monumental tragedy’ and how a century later Turkish leaders continue to deny the genocide and blame the victims. He also noted evidence of a cover-up by the United States, which he called the “Smyrna Gate”, as commercial interests led some officials to downplay the seriousness of the situation in the reports. Meanwhile, others, like George Horton and Asa Jennings, have taken it upon themselves to help save lives.

Dr Bartrop from Australia mentioned how thousands of Australians lined up 100 years ago this week at recruiting offices to fight Turkey after hearing reports of what was happening in Smyrna. He talked about the Allies and Greece after World War I and the circumstances that led to the burning of Smyrna.

Szany noted that this commemoration is “a way of keeping history alive 100 years after the atrocities were committed” and “our duty is to reflect on the lessons learned.”

It is not enough “to curse the darkness… [we must] illuminate the future…affirm our responsibility to humanity, teach others and be stewards of this memory we share…commit others to never forget,” she said.

Broadcast journalist and media director John E. Davis, Illinois Holocaust Museum board member and AMPHRC board member, served as master of ceremonies for the event, noting the need to “take a stand for humanity”. and raise awareness of the Genocide of the Greeks of Asia Minor to prevent further atrocities. “The Museum stands with the Greek community,” he said, to “light the torch of truth in the world.”

His Eminence Metropolitan Nathanael of Chicago, in his remarks, mentioned that his family came from Asia Minor, had been forced to flee their home and took the first boat they could to find refuge in Greece. He said: “Today…is one of the rare occasions when there are no words to express what is in our hearts, when we are most authentic when we simply stand in silence. before a mystery that is beyond our comprehension, beyond our ability to process, beyond words… Our words fail to capture the depth and horror of this event and yet we absolutely must talk about it, we absolutely must study historical sources, personal accounts and hard facts with scholarly integrity so as never to forget and never allow lies to further profane the dignity of those who have suffered. In other words, we are called to be silent and we are called to speak the truth today, 100 years after the perpetration of the Great Fire.

George Shirinian, author and executive director of the Zoryan Institute. Photo: TNH Staff

Among those present, Consul General of Greece in Chicago Manos Koubarakis gave a brief history of the Catastrophe, noting that the 1.5 million refugees who sought to rebuild their lives in Greece propelled the economy forward. in the interwar period, contributing in various ways, economically, socially and culturally to the country. He noted that one of the lessons is that Hellenism must act in solidarity and unity.

Davis also mentioned the Tokei Maru, a Japanese merchant ship, whose captain ordered his crew to unload valuable cargo so he could save people from the disaster, saving more than 800 lives. He applauded the Japanese government and people, inviting a representative from the Japanese Consulate General in Chicago who thanked the Greek people for remembering the heroic humanitarian effort of the Japanese captain and crew.

The Honorary Consul of the Republic of Armenia in Chicago, Oscar S. Tatosian, was also present, and in his remarks he highlighted the visit of United States House Speaker Nancy Pelosi to Armenia and the cease -the current fire with Azerbaijan.

For thousands of years Smyrna was the wealthiest of the cities now located on the Aegean coast of Turkey, an elegant and cosmopolitan city where Greeks, Armenians, Turks, Jews and others lived and worked together – a city known for its religious tolerance.

The Great Fire of Smyrna (Smyrna Disaster) began on September 13, 1922, after the Turkish Armed Forces entered Smyrna, a deliberate act by the Turkish government to destroy or expel the Greeks and any other Christian population. All the Greek and Armenian quarters of the city were destroyed, forcing the population to flee and seek refuge in Greece and elsewhere. Historians believe the number of victims was in the tens of thousands, while the number of refugees exceeded one million. Thousands of Greek and Armenian men were then deported to the interior of Anatolia, where many died in harsh and brutal conditions. After the catastrophe of Smyrna, the Hellenic city founded more than 3,000 years ago, jewel of the eastern Mediterranean, ceased to have a Hellenic community.

Partner organizations for the event include: Greek Orthodox Metropolis of Chicago, National Hellenic Museum, Center for Hellenic Studies at the University of Chicago, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki – Pontic Studies, Hellenic American Leadership Council, the Armenian National Committee of Illinois, the Assyrian American Civic Club of Chicago, ENOSIS – Federation of Hellenic American Organizations of Illinois, Hellenic American Women’s Council, Hellenic Link Midwest, PanPontian Federation of USA and Canada, Pontian Greek Society of Chicago, Pontian Youth Association of USA and Canada and UCLA SNF Hellenic Center.

More information about the Illinois Holocaust Museum & Education Center is available online: https://www.ilholocaustmuseum.org/.

Learn more about AMPHRC online: https://hellenicresearchcenter.org.

]]>
The scene in the SA postcard may have been the work of an artist/activist https://temescalartscenter.org/the-scene-in-the-sa-postcard-may-have-been-the-work-of-an-artist-activist/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 17:13:56 +0000 https://temescalartscenter.org/the-scene-in-the-sa-postcard-may-have-been-the-work-of-an-artist-activist/ SAN ANTONIO- I have included a postcard with a scene from the Spanish Governor’s Palace which may have been created by Rena Maverick Green. Was it? Mary Rowena “Rena” Maverick Green (1874-1962) was part of two influential families, as the granddaughter of Texas Declaration of Independence signer Samuel Maverick and wife of Robert B. Green, […]]]>

SAN ANTONIO- I have included a postcard with a scene from the Spanish Governor’s Palace which may have been created by Rena Maverick Green. Was it?

Mary Rowena “Rena” Maverick Green (1874-1962) was part of two influential families, as the granddaughter of Texas Declaration of Independence signer Samuel Maverick and wife of Robert B. Green, who had been Bexar County judge and was a state senator. at the time of his death in 1907. He died at age 41 on a hunting trip of “rheumatism of the heart” or rheumatic heart disease, probably resulting from a streptococcal infection.

His 33-year-old widow moved with their four children, all under the age of 10, to her parents’ ranch near Boerne. She returned to the city after a few years to become an influencer in her own right – as an activist, civic reformer, historical curator and artist.

More from Paula Allen: The San Antonio suffragist, a member of the progressive Maverick family, used her social status to advocate for herself

Green advocated for women’s suffrage, the hiring of San Antonio’s first female police officers, and the establishment of its first legal aid department. As a founding member of the San Antonio Conservation Society (now the Conservation Society of San Antonio), she also fought successfully for the preservation of the downtown section of the San Antonio River, the Spanish Colonial Missions, and of the building illustrated on your postcard.

On the back of the undated card, the following is printed: “Centennial Scene/Spanish Governor’s Palace/Built in 1722/San Antonio, Texas. On the front, the person wearing a sombrero and the red beast lying in the street probably evoke the early days of this local monument, which served as the seat of colonial government here until 1804, when it was sold by the last captain of the Spaniard. military garrison. From then on it was used as a private residence and eventually housed businesses such as a saloon, pawnshop and tire shop.

Two of the city’s earliest organizations advocating historic preservation became interested in saving the old, neglected structure – the Texas Historical and Landmarks Association of Adina De Zavala (later the De Zavala Chapter of the Daughters of the Republic of Texas) and the Conservation Society.

The palace – so named by De Zavala during a campaign in the mid-1910s to save the Spanish royal relic – was in such poor condition that it was in danger of being demolished. De Zavala worked with local officials and businessmen and asked for contributions, but they were few and small — less than a dozen, at $1 to $5, as reported by the San Antonio Light. , June 19, 1917.

More from Paula Allen: Reader’s home in Alamo Heights was a frontier’s last home

The fledgling Conservation Society wanted to avoid the appearance of direct competition, according to meeting minutes in the Rena Maverick Green Papers at the Briscoe Center for American History at the University of Texas at Austin. A library assistant said: ‘There was a reference to the omission of the Spanish Governor’s Palace from the Society’s (then) current campaign, as the Landmarks Association ‘were particularly interested and we did not wish to upset them’ .stated in the society’s minutes of September 4, 1924, an agreement was reached between the two preservation groups that would leave fundraising to a committee of businessmen, but “no (underlined) campaign n ‘resulted’.

But with Green as chairman of a citizens’ advisory council and $30,000 in municipal funds, the restoration was completed in 1930; and after years of wrangling between private and public interests, the renovated historic site was officially opened in 1931 and opened to visitors as one of the city’s oldest cultural attractions.

So is there a connection between Green and this postcard?

There is no mention of this in his Briscoe Center papers. Due to the title “Centennial Scene” on the back, I showed it to local historian Sarah Reveley, who collected Texas Centennial memorabilia from the 1936 celebration, including postcards, and made donation to the Briscoe Center. After reviewing her records, Reveley said she had never seen “Centennial Scene” postcards before and was not aware of a series with that name.

More from Paula Allen: Volunteers organized the San Antonio Bicentennial celebration in 1930

The signature itself – capitalized “green” – is ambiguous. The McNay Art Museum has one of his paintings, “Mama and Parrot”, from the collection of Marion Koogler McNay, whose bequest established the museum. Its online catalog describes the work (not currently visible) as a watercolor on paper, signed “Rena Green” at the bottom right, same position as in the photo of the Palace.

The postcard illustration “appears to be a woodcut, which would explain the use of carved capital letters,” said Lewis Fisher, author of “Saving San Antonio: The Preservation of a Heritage,” a history of the Conservation Society which covers the restoration of the palace. .

Although Fisher did not see any attribution to Green, he thinks the postcard is likely his work: “Given its close association with the Governor’s Palace, it is highly probable that it did, and I don’t know of any other contemporary local artist named Green.

No publisher’s name is printed on the map, so Fisher speculates it might have been privately printed to support the restoration, completed in time for its bicentennial celebration by the city, observing the arrival in 1731 of the inhabitants of the Canary Islands, the first civilian settlers of San Antonio.

More from Paula Allen: Canarian ties to San Fernando Cathedral stretch from the mid-1700s to modern baptism

In Fisher’s book there is mention of the palace’s first guardian, Josephine Rote, who had the idea of ​​commissioning “15 well-known artists to paint scenes in and on the palace”, for sale at $15 each, with proceeds from the paintings to fund the printing of postcards to be sold at the new tourist attraction. Conservation Society Librarian Beth Standiford found no documentation of Green as one of these artists, but she did find a clipping of a story in the San Antonio Express, March 15, 1931, announcing a project guide and quoting Rote that “Mary Bonner and other artists will paint images of the Palace, which will be reproduced on souvenir postcards.

If a Palace art project was done, Green had the chops for being asked.

She had studied in the 1920s in Provincetown, Massachusetts, and San Francisco with two notable artists – the sculptor/painter Maurice Sterne, whose works have been collected by the Museum of Modern Art in New York; and Charles Martin, who taught selected students including Georgia O’Keeffe. Presenting, teaching and working at the Villita Street Gallery from the late 1930s to the late 1940s, she was a member of the San Antonio Arts League and other artist groups.

From Paula Allen: En route to Texas fame, the San Antonio-bound ‘noble’ entertainer was anything but

Green exhibited frequently – paintings with the San Antonio Artists Exhibit and sculptures with the Texas Sculptors Group at the Witte Museum, where she won an award for her terracotta “grandmother”. Her watercolor, ‘Magnolias in Persian Vase’, won the Southern States Art League’s ‘Best Flower Painting’ award and has been exhibited throughout the region.

La Witte has none of his artwork, said Leslie Ochoa, director of collections, but the museum has received many donations of historical artifacts from him. A drinking gourd used by Samuel Maverick as a prisoner in Mexico after the 1842 Woll invasion is currently on display at the Cultural Mix Theater at the South Texas Heritage Center. During the 1930s, Green also gave Witte historical fashion pieces – a cape, apron, hat, handbag, fan, children’s clothes and horn buttons – worn by her or by members of his pioneer family.

His greatest gift was one of his last. In 1942, she donated a uniform, flag, badge and other items used by her late husband as captain of the Belknap Rifles, a militia founded in 1884.

Green never remarried and was always referred to as “Judge Green’s Widow” in accounts of the awards she won in 1959 and 1960. One of her last projects was “Robert B. Green: A Personal Reminiscence”, a book about her late husband. , published in 1962.

She died on November 3, 1962, of a sudden heart attack, according to her death certificate, which lists her occupation as a “housewife”.

For nearly half a century of her widowhood, she saw two world wars, the Great Depression, the invention of radio and television, space exploration and the development of antibiotics that could have extended life from her husband. On her own, she accomplished a lot…and probably never stopped wanting to tell him everything she saw and did.


historycolumn@yahoo.com | Twitter: @sahistorycolumn | Facebook: San Antonio History Column

]]>
🌱 Man Attacked in Roswell Park + Sawnee EMC Fellowship + Museum Day https://temescalartscenter.org/%f0%9f%8c%b1-man-attacked-in-roswell-park-sawnee-emc-fellowship-museum-day/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 01:18:00 +0000 https://temescalartscenter.org/%f0%9f%8c%b1-man-attacked-in-roswell-park-sawnee-emc-fellowship-museum-day/ Good morning everyone. It’s Friday in Roswell and I’m back in your inbox to update you on all the big stuff happening in town. Because community information is power! First, today’s weather forecast: Sunny and pleasant. High: 83 Low: 62. Our local sponsor has great things to offer: Looking to buy or sell a home […]]]>

Good morning everyone. It’s Friday in Roswell and I’m back in your inbox to update you on all the big stuff happening in town. Because community information is power!


First, today’s weather forecast:

Sunny and pleasant. High: 83 Low: 62.


Our local sponsor has great things to offer:

Looking to buy or sell a home in the Roswell area? Roxie and Michael Hernandez of Keller Williams Realty Consultants have worked in real estate in our area since 1995 and are deeply involved in the community, serving on the boards of Foster Care Support, Roswell First Responder Foundation and Roswell Rotary. Whether you’re moving, investing or a first-time buyer, work with deep local expertise you can trust. Visit Roxie and Michael here to learn more.

Click here to feature your business in this spot.


Here are the top four stories in Roswell today:

  • Roswell High School: A junior at Roswell HS, Austin Edler, was recognized for his service and contribution to the community. Edler came up with the idea of ​​starting a service club at school. After gaining the support of a teacher and recruiting 25 students to join. They created the Roswell High School STAR House Club. This is an after-school program to help young students. (Roswell Crosse via Twitter)
  • Keep Roswell Beautiful: Rivers Alive’s annual Cleanup Day takes place on Saturday, September 17. The city will join this statewide initiative to clean up and preserve all 70,100 miles of rivers and streams in Georgia. Volunteer groups will be placed throughout Roswell to clean up litter along our trails, parks and waterways. They will also eliminate invasive plant species. (roswellgov.com)
  • Roswell reads: For National Arts and Humanities Month, the Cultural Arts Center will host Pulitzer Prize-winning author Geraldine Brooks. She will talk about her new book titled Horse. Tickets are on sale for this October 1 event. (Roswell CAC via Instagram)

More from our sponsors – please support the local news!

Featured companies:

Events:

Concerts and Services:

Jobs :


All right, all is well for today. See you tomorrow morning for another update!

Jessica Griffin

About me: My name is Jessica Griffin and I am from Roswell, Georgia. I have been in the Roswell-Alpharetta community for over 30 years. As a native “Roswellian”, I embody, participate in, and support all things local. Community is at the heart of all of us, and I aim to convey the collectivity and unity that should be promoted and celebrated throughout our community. Being a mother, writer, student in history and the arts are my passions.

Have a timely tip or suggestion for an upcoming Roswell Daily? Contact me at Roswell@Patch.com

]]>
SAAACAM may move to historic Kress-Grant building https://temescalartscenter.org/saaacam-may-move-to-historic-kress-grant-building/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 09:16:25 +0000 https://temescalartscenter.org/saaacam-may-move-to-historic-kress-grant-building/ A museum to preserve San Antonio’s black history may soon be housed in the Kress-Grant Building, known for its role in desegregating downtown food outlets during the Civil Rights Movement. The San Antonio African American Community Museum and Archive was awarded a $5 million matching grant as part of the 2023 Bexar County Budget to […]]]>

A museum to preserve San Antonio’s black history may soon be housed in the Kress-Grant Building, known for its role in desegregating downtown food outlets during the Civil Rights Movement.

The San Antonio African American Community Museum and Archive was awarded a $5 million matching grant as part of the 2023 Bexar County Budget to help start a museum in downtown Houston Street.

The five-year-old museum organization is to raise $20 million to buy the building, which once housed one of seven downtown lunch counters that peacefully fell apart in 1960.

Funding for the project comes from just over $10 million in capital projects requested by commissioners to support SAAACAM, as well as the Briscoe Western Art Museum, Mexican American Civil Rights Institute, and other educational and cultural organizations. , neighborhoods and non-profit organizations.

On ExpressNews.com: Alamo reports support preservation of Woolworth Building, food counter desegregation stories

Deborah Omowale Jarmon, CEO of SAAACAM, said the organization still needs to raise $15 million for the project. The group hopes to use funds from the National Endowment for Humanities, the Houston Street Tax Increment Reinvestment Zone, foundations and other private sources.

As the budget was approved on Tuesday, Bexar County Judge Nelson Wolff singled out the SAAACAM project as one of many “exciting things” in the spending plan.

The San Antonio African American Community Archives and Museum hopes to purchase the 1935 Grant Building and the 1939 Kress Building as their new home. The Kress building was home to one of seven lunch counters in downtown San Antonio that were peacefully desegregated on March 16, 1960.

ROBERT MCLEROY, STAFF/SAN ANTONIO EXPRESS-NEWS

“The step towards having a real African American museum is a huge step for this community. They now have a small operation in La Villita, and that would be the first start of trying to really do something meaningful that really traces the history of the African-American community here and the great leaders who have come out of it,” Wolff said.

In a written proposal to commissioners, SAAACAM leaders said the project will ensure the desegregation of downtown lunch counters, which briefly put San Antonio in the national spotlight, will “live forever in the history of America, San Antonio and the civil rights movement of that era.”

The adjacent renovated structures on the 300 block of Houston Street are owned by GrayStreet Partners/CBRE and were recently put up for sale. SAAACAM plans to provide additional renovations and designate approximately half of the 120,000 square foot building for lease as office space and other revenue-generating uses.

Trinity University history professor Carey Latimore put forward the concept in 2019 of establishing a civil rights institute in the Kress building because of its ties to the civil rights movement. Latimore, who was involved in several historic downtown projects including improvements to Alamo and San Pedro Creek, was later diagnosed with cancer. He died on July 26 at age 46.

Our Lady of the Lake University and Texas American Indians in Spanish Colonial Missions are SAAACAM research partners.

On ExpressNews.com: ‘The Alamo has lost a great friend’; Latimore was 46

“Partnering with OLLU expands our reach to collect, preserve and share Afro-Mexican heritage from the San Antonio area,” the group said in its proposal. “The partnership with AITSCM will help us develop the narrative of the African natives beginning with the arrival of the African slave Estavanico in the region with the Spaniards in 1529.”

Estavanico was a scout and interpreter who helped native groups communicate with members of the early Spanish expeditions to Texas.

SAAACAM has a 715 square foot exhibit space at 218 S. Presa St. in the southwest corner of the historic La Villita Arts Village and leases 2,800 square feet of office space to the Witte Museum. But the organization says it cannot stay self-sufficient by renting space. He plans to use revenue from the Kress-Grant building to provide free access to the museum’s main exhibition galleries and most of its programming.


shuddleston@express-news.net

]]>