Museum organizations http://temescalartscenter.org/ Thu, 26 May 2022 10:03:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://temescalartscenter.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-1.png Museum organizations http://temescalartscenter.org/ 32 32 The city’s historical organizations celebrate preservation month The city’s historical organizations celebrate preservation month https://temescalartscenter.org/the-citys-historical-organizations-celebrate-preservation-month-the-citys-historical-organizations-celebrate-preservation-month/ Thu, 26 May 2022 09:51:26 +0000 https://temescalartscenter.org/the-citys-historical-organizations-celebrate-preservation-month-the-citys-historical-organizations-celebrate-preservation-month/ Daily archive photo by Sean Hong The Frances Willard House Museum. The National Historic Landmark reopened to tourists on May 19 as part of the Evanston Preservation Commission’s Preservation Month. The Shorefront Legacy Center unveiled two inaugural heritage site markers this month as part of a project to recognize African American heritage sites and the […]]]>

Daily archive photo by Sean Hong

The Frances Willard House Museum. The National Historic Landmark reopened to tourists on May 19 as part of the Evanston Preservation Commission’s Preservation Month.

The Shorefront Legacy Center unveiled two inaugural heritage site markers this month as part of a project to recognize African American heritage sites and the contributions of African Americans to the Evanston community.

On May 14, residents gathered at the homes of Edwin B. Jourdain Jr. and Lorraine H. Morton to honor these sites in an important milestone of this mission. The event was part of the Evanston Preservation Commission’s 2022 Preservation Month celebration: “People Saving Places”. Throughout the month of May, the commission organizes several events across the city.

The Shorefront Legacy Center invited community members to nominate historic places they consider vital to the community before considering the suggestions in committee, according to co-founder Morris “Dino” Robinson.

Robinson said he hopes this process will help residents find the agency by telling the story of the area as they know it.

“When you have groups or institutions that don’t know a population (who) are trying to tell that story, they may not understand the nuances and idiosyncrasies of that particular community,” Robinson said. “We want to put that control back in the hands of the community, to determine what’s important. They write a narrative and justify it on their own terms.

A former resident of one of the sites honored during the event, Lorraine H. Morton was Evanston’s first black mayor. She began her career as a teacher at Foster School in 1953 and served the Evanston community for over 50 years. Robinson said Morton had advocated for economic growth in the downtown core during his administration.

In 1931, Edwin Jourdain – a former resident of the other heritage site – became Evanston’s first black alderman, a position he held until 1947. Robinson said Jourdain was a driving force in the fighting the city’s Jim Crow policies, desegregating movie theaters, public beaches and other public spaces.

Six additional heritage markers will be placed at sites in Evanston by the end of the year, Robinson said.

The designation of historic markers was the first of three events held during Preservation Month. On May 12, the History Center hosted a presentation by transit historian Walter Keevil on the Yellow Line, and on May 19 and 22, the Frances Willard House, a National Historic Landmark, reopened for tours. in person.

Willard, a former educator and suffragette, was a founding member of the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union, which began in 1874. She was criticized by anti-lynching activist and journalist Ida B. Wells, who said she used stereotypes of black men abusing alcohol and attacking women to gain support for WCTU concerns in the South.

Lori Osborne, director of the Frances Willard House Museum, said that although Willard was not a perfect leader, she promoted women’s rights and their quality of life. Osborne added that visitors are encouraged to take a close look at Willard’s life to understand the full story of his work.

“At this particular time in our history, we question what it means to honor the leaders of our past,” Osborne said. “We’re trying to figure out where we can really face the truth of people’s leadership, but recognizing them for the wonderful work they’ve done.”

Carlos Ruiz, the city’s preservation coordinator, helped organize Preservation Month. He said he hopes this month’s events can help citizens become more aware of the diversity of people who have contributed to Evanston’s culture and history.

With the end of Preservation Month, he hopes people will continue to learn about the history of their own community.

“Evanston has long prided itself on being a very diverse community,” Ruiz said. “So we try to make sure that we recognize everyone who has contributed, regardless of race, religion or ethnicity.”

E-mail: [email protected]

Twitter: @aaronwangxxx

Related stories:

Home of Evanston’s first black resident named new African-American heritage site

Frances Willard House Museum discusses the relationship between Willard and Ida B. Wells

Local leaders reflect on how Lorraine Morton shaped Evanston politics today

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Unsung Heroes of Early Oak Ridge History by Carolyn Krause https://temescalartscenter.org/unsung-heroes-of-early-oak-ridge-history-by-carolyn-krause/ Mon, 23 May 2022 01:08:41 +0000 https://temescalartscenter.org/unsung-heroes-of-early-oak-ridge-history-by-carolyn-krause/ Oak Ridge resident Carolyn Krause will present a talk titled “Unsung Heroes in Early Oak Ridge” at 7 p.m. Tuesday, May 24 at the Oak Ridge History Museum. The program is free and open to the public. The story will include a discussion of Al Nier; Virginia Coleman; Stanley Thompson, Glenn Seaborg’s most valued colleague; […]]]>

Oak Ridge resident Carolyn Krause will present a talk titled “Unsung Heroes in Early Oak Ridge” at 7 p.m. Tuesday, May 24 at the Oak Ridge History Museum.

The program is free and open to the public.

The story will include a discussion of Al Nier; Virginia Coleman; Stanley Thompson, Glenn Seaborg’s most valued colleague; J. Robert Oppenheimer; and George Koval, a Soviet spy.

Al Nier with mass spectrometer artifacts.

Krause, a magazine editor and science writer retired for 11 years from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, spends some of her time writing articles as a volunteer reporter for The Oak Ridger, where she worked as a reporter. scientist from 1970 to 1975. She writes about people involved in science, technology, Oak Ridge history and social justice issues. She contributes to D. Ray Smith’s “Historically Speaking” column in the newspaper and does publicity for several organizations and her church. For 25 years, she was editor of the award-winning research magazine ORNL Review for lay readers, for which she wrote numerous interview-based articles.

At the atomic bomb proving ground near Almagordo, NM, University of California physicist Dr. J. Robert Oppenheimer smokes his pipe as he gazes at the site on September 9, 1945.

A member of the International Society for Technical Communication, she was president of the East Tennessee chapter of STC for one year. She is currently a member of the boards of Friends of ORNL (FORNL) and the Oak Ridge Institute for Continued Learning (ORICL).

A native of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Krause holds a BA in English from the College of Wooster, an MAT degree from the University of Pittsburgh, and an MSJ degree from the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University. She previously spoke to the Oak Ridge Heritage & Preservation Association about Oak Ridge’s historic mercury contamination problem and the responses of local researchers and others as they sought to understand and address it. She and her husband Herb, a retired atomic physicist from ORNL and president of FORNL, have two adult children and two grandchildren.

The Oak Ridge History Museum is located at 102 Robertsville Road in Oak Ridge, the old Wildcat Den.

A tour bus stops at the Oak Ridge History Museum.
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N°692: Disappearing docks, freshman docs, Sadaharu Oh and Cher, with quiche for all https://temescalartscenter.org/n692-disappearing-docks-freshman-docs-sadaharu-oh-and-cher-with-quiche-for-all/ Fri, 20 May 2022 09:03:35 +0000 https://temescalartscenter.org/n692-disappearing-docks-freshman-docs-sadaharu-oh-and-cher-with-quiche-for-all/ Always impressive: You’ve done it again, dear readers – it’s Friday and you’re about to wrap up another busy and productive work week. Well done, as usual. Before you get to mowing the front lawn, washing the back deck and watching the hockey playoffs, just one more work day to rock – so let’s get […]]]>

Always impressive: You’ve done it again, dear readers – it’s Friday and you’re about to wrap up another busy and productive work week. Well done, as usual.

Before you get to mowing the front lawn, washing the back deck and watching the hockey playoffs, just one more work day to rock – so let’s get to it.

Go to trial: Today is May 20 and we begin with a heartfelt greeting to scientific researchers, patient volunteers and all those who do International Clinical Trials Day possible.

Wheels up (or down): Today is also National Bike to Work Day. If you’re already at work and didn’t know that, sorry.

Please relieve the sting generously via National Quiche Lorraine Day (still May 20) and National Pizza Day (always the third Friday of May).

How about a piece of beef and mustard? I don’t know if he had a Chicago-style deep dish with olives and onions to celebrate (probably not), but Shakespeare’s “Sonnets” were first published on this date in 1609 in London.

This is the idea: I don’t know if he hit the Sbarro in Roosevelt Field’s food court first (probably not), but American aviator Charles Lindbergh took off from the area in present-day shopping mecca on May 20, 1927, on the way to Paris and history.

According to witnesses, the Spirit of Saint Louis was so loaded with fuel that it barely cleared the telephone wires at the end of the runway.

IP in spaaaaace: Naval research scientist Robert Baumann landed the first-ever US patent for an orbiting satellite 64 years ago today, giving the federal government the rights to his new avant-garde sphere design.

Speaking of satellites, the Pioneer Venus Orbiter – the first human probe to reach a stable orbit around our (a little, sometimes closer) planetary neighbor – took off on this date 44 years ago.

Nuclear Flash: Now solar-powered, the Baltimore Harbor Lighthouse has become the world’s first lighthouse powered by a nuclear reactor on May 20, 1964. (The reactor was retired just two years later, for those who mattered.)

Rise and Shine: And back in space, after nearly a month of orbital checks, the Hubble Space Telescope opened its eyes on this date in 1990 and sent home its first photo from space.

Yes, Mr. Minister: American clergyman Antoinette Brown Blackwell (1825-1921) – who was denied the college certifications she obtained, but nevertheless became the first American woman ordained minister of a recognized denomination – would be 197 years old today.

Also born on May 20, British-American physician, inventor, painter and amateur architect William Thornton (1759-1828), who was the First Architect of the United States Capitol; British aeronautical engineer Reginald Mitchell (1895-1937), who designed the Supermarine Spitfires, a World War II workaholic; American film icon James Maitland “Jimmy” Stewart (1908-1997), a graduate of Princeton and accomplished military pilot; American engineer and entrepreneur William Hewlett (1913-2001), who co-founder of Hewlett-Packard Co.; and Japanese baseball legend Sadaharu Oh (b. 1940), owner of the career home run world record (an unassailable 868 dingers).

Go back in time: And bow down, Cherilyn Sarkisian! The American singer and actress – sometimes known as the goddess of pop, but most often as Cher – turns 76 today.

Give Chaz Bono’s mother to sincere Shoop, Shoop to editor@innovateli.com, where [We’ve] Got You, Babe, and your topical tips and calendar events make us strong enough. (Do they? You better believe it).

About our sponsor: SUNY Old Westbury empowers students to own the future they want. In a small college atmosphere and as part of a vibrant and diverse student body that today numbers 5,000, students at Old Westbury learn about the lives and careers they want to pursue. Whether it’s a cutting-edge graduate program in data analytics, highly respected programs in accounting and computer information science, or one of more than 70 degrees available, a SUNY education Old Westbury puts students on the path to success. Own your future.

BUT FIRST, THIS

Watch out for gaps: A new scientific study reveals huge gaps in U.S. coastal conservation, with the Mid-Atlantic region essentially “a gaping hole of unprotected waters.”

That’s the word from Ellen Pikitch, endowed professor of ocean conservation science at Stony Brook University School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciencesone of 31 researchers who contributed to “A Scientific Synthesis of Marine Protected Areas in the United States: Status and Recommendations”. Published this month by the peer-reviewed scientific journal Frontiers in Marine Science, the article analyzes Marine protected areas – parks, coastlines and other areas with conservation-minded protections – and reveals that most US coastal waters are “significantly unprotected”, including a “vast majority of the Mid-Atlantic coast”.

The study calculates that just 2% of U.S. waters outside the central Pacific region have conservation protections — both negligent and dangerous, according to Pikitch, who also runs SoMAS’ Institute of Ocean Conservation Sciences. “Much work needs to be done, and quickly, to significantly expand marine protection in large areas of U.S. waters that have been largely neglected,” Pikitch said. “It is of particular concern that only 0.3% of the Mid-Atlantic region is conserved and that the strength of this protection is very weak.”

Beginners: Long Island’s myriad medical schools advanced their annual harvests of new health care providers, including one school that graduated its very first degree.

the NYU Long Island School of Medicine — which opened in Mineola three years ago as the nation’s first accelerated medical program focused exclusively on training primary care physicians — celebrated its first graduates on Tuesday. The school, also among the first in the country tuition free medical schoolshonored a 20-member Class of 2022 specially trained in four primary care areas: Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, and OB/GYN.

After residencies at Johns Hopkins MedicineNYU Langone Hospital-Long Island and other prestigious institutions, new graduates will provide much-needed frontline health care reinforcements, with the Association of American Medical Colleges foresee a dramatic shortage primary care physicians in the United States over the next decade. “[The Class of 2022] is the realization of a bold vision to make medical school financially accessible and attract outstanding students to the primary care field,” NYU Langone Health CEO Robert Grossman said in a statement. “We hope that many graduating physicians will choose to practice on Long Island, keeping our communities healthy and helping NYU Langone Health grow our network of quality physicians.”

TOP OF THE SITE

Shared load: Seven bustling social service agencies on Long Island have united under the umbrella of a startup Master Service Organization.

Attention buyer: Today’s residential real estate market is like a wild roller coaster, but this New York Tech professor can help emotional buyers keep their cool.

Listen, class: Leaders in Long Island’s innovation economy teach exclusive life lessons on Spark: The Innovate Long Island Podcast, 30 entertaining minutes at a time – and it’s tuition-free!.

ICYMI

Bigger Island Harvest will keep food lines moving; greater global droughts will keep human populations on the move.

THE BEST OF THE WEST (AND SOMETIMES NORTH/SOUTH)

Innovate LI’s inbox is overflowing with inspiring innovations from all over North America. This week’s brightest foreigners:

From Wyoming: Sheridan-based Hyper Hemp Lifestyle Wellness Labs Expands Dopamine/Serotonin Research With natural cannabinoid supplement for opioid recovery.

From Georgia: Atlanta-based private education pioneer Primrose Schools kicks off robotics summer program full of STEM learning and charitable giving.

From New York: We Ascend Now, a Brooklyn-based improvement office, launches “decentralized social community» promote socio-economic growth through truth and unity.

MOVING

+ patrick lloyd was named Dean of the Stony Brook University School of Dentistry. He was previously dean of the College of Dentistry at Ohio State University.

+ Eric Wiggins was promoted to general manager of Didit, based in Melville. He previously served as senior vice president of business development.

+ Paul Vetrano was appointed to the Board of Directors of Maryland-based UMPS CARE Charities. He is Director of Global Sales at Deloitte in Jericho.

+ William Claxton joined Hauppauge-based Austin Williams as Paid Search Strategist. He was previously an assistant media planner at Connecticut-based Touchpoint Integrated Communications.

+ Therese Dilman was promoted to Chief Nursing Officer and Associate Executive Director of Patient Care Services at Glen Cove Hospital. She was previously senior administrative director at North Shore University Hospital in Manhasset.

+ Beth Ann Balalaos was elected to the Board of Directors of the Troy-based Museum Association of New York. She is responsible for access and inclusion at the Long Island Children’s Museum in Garden City.

+ Cody Marie Miller has been appointed as the Conservation and Stewardship Officer of the Mashomack Preserve on Shelter Island by the Nature Conservancy. She was previously the land conservation coordinator for a chapter of the Central Florida Nature Conservancy.

Do you like this newsletter?Sponsorships of the Innovate Long Island newsletter, website and podcast are a great opportunity to reach the inventors, investors, entrepreneurs and leaders you need to know (just ask SUNY Old Westbury).Marlene McDonnell can tell you more.

UNDER THE FOLD

Only in America: The Buffalo Massacre reconfirms the nation’s deep-rooted racism, once again.

Only in New York: The Port Authority establishes the $27 LaGuardia Airport Beer.

Only in Taiwan: Pizza Hut breaks up time and space with the chicken, Oreo and calamari pie.

Only on Long Island: Please continue to support the incredible organizations that support Innovate Long Island, including SUNY Old Westbury, one of many SUNY schools making the island a mecca for higher education. Check them.

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Grimes Auctions Met Gala Props For Ukrainian Families – NBC New York https://temescalartscenter.org/grimes-auctions-met-gala-props-for-ukrainian-families-nbc-new-york/ Wed, 18 May 2022 04:16:48 +0000 https://temescalartscenter.org/grimes-auctions-met-gala-props-for-ukrainian-families-nbc-new-york/ Sewing for a cause. Grimes is doing its part to support Black, Indigenous and People of Color in Ukraine by auctioning off some of its most memorable fashion accessories. “I’m auctioning off stuff from my Met Gala look last year to raise money to help get BIPOC families outside Ukraine because they find it difficult […]]]>

Sewing for a cause.

Grimes is doing its part to support Black, Indigenous and People of Color in Ukraine by auctioning off some of its most memorable fashion accessories.

“I’m auctioning off stuff from my Met Gala look last year to raise money to help get BIPOC families outside Ukraine because they find it difficult to get out at the border,” she said. shared in an Instagram post on May 16, adding that the auction presented at the HVW8 gallery in Los Angeles includes “the works of 50 distinguished artists who aim to support families of emergency response and BIPOC inside and outside of Ukraine”.

Explaining that each piece in the auction “offers a unique take on the ‘resistance’ theme,” Grimes donated a whimsical pair of earringsdesigned by Romantic Elf Jewelry, and a chrome Face mask CHRISHABANA x Dune Harkonnen.

the experimental musician brought the pieces to the Met Gala 2021 in September, accompanied by a sheer dress Iris Van Herpen, for the event’s “In America: A Lexicon of Fashion” theme. His gaze – which was inspired by the 1984 cult classic “Dune” (and next remake of 2021) based on Frank Herbert’s novel – also included a medieval sword replica repurposed from a Colt AR-15A3.

Gilbert Carrasquillo/GC Images via Getty Images

In this Sept. 13, 2021, file photo, singer Grimes attends the 2021 Met Gala Celebrating In America: A Lexicon Of Fashion at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.

The weapon, however, is not up for auction, as it is “a permanent piece” in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Best Met Gala props of all time

Check out some of the best looks from the Met Gala 2021.

All proceeds from the auction will go to the non-profit organizations Diaspora Relief and Razom for Ukraine, which will use the funds to provide food, shelter and evacuation assistance to people in need, the official explained. interpreter of “Genesis”. Bidding is open exclusively on Artsy and will begin closing on May 26.

Grimes, 34 — who shares two children with his ex Elon Musk – is just one of many celebrities who have made efforts to help Ukraine during the recent Russian invasion. In March, Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis shared a video on Instagram announcing that they had reached their goal of raising $30 million to help the European country.

“Over 65,000 of you have donated,” said Kunis, who left Ukraine for the United States in 1991. “We are overwhelmed with gratitude for the support. be [solving] problem, our collective effort will provide a soft landing for so many as they move forward into their uncertain future.”

Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis have reached their $30 million donation goal for Ukraine amid the Russian invasion. The couple took to Instagram on Thursday to share the exciting news.

That same month, MTV’s The Challenge’s Johnny Bananas joined a humanitarian convoyrun by the Humanosh refugee foundation, to deliver medical and other supplies to Ukrainians.


Click here for comprehensive coverage of the crisis in Ukraine.

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City of Sydney provides seed funding for new LGBT museum in Oxford Street https://temescalartscenter.org/city-of-sydney-provides-seed-funding-for-new-lgbt-museum-in-oxford-street/ Mon, 16 May 2022 14:00:01 +0000 https://temescalartscenter.org/city-of-sydney-provides-seed-funding-for-new-lgbt-museum-in-oxford-street/ The City of Sydney voted unanimously to provide an ad hoc grant to fund the development of an LGBTQI museum. On Monday, Sydney City Council voted to grant $283,500 to nonprofit Qtopia’s proposal to open a queer memorial and museum in the Oxford Street area. Grant to cover part of start-up costs According to Council […]]]>

The City of Sydney voted unanimously to provide an ad hoc grant to fund the development of an LGBTQI museum.

On Monday, Sydney City Council voted to grant $283,500 to nonprofit Qtopia’s proposal to open a queer memorial and museum in the Oxford Street area.

Grant to cover part of start-up costs

According to Council documents, the grant “will cover a portion of the start-up costs identified in their business plan.”

The grant will be paid in installments based on securing a location within six months and continued investment in the museum.

According to Qtopia CEO Greg Fisher, “There have been significant in-kind contributions so far. And there has been huge corporate interest in supporting Qtopia’s funding. Once we have these two elements in place. We are very confident of strong corporate support based on discussions we have had with a number of organisations.

An upfront payment of $100,000 will help Qtopia find a suitable location as well as assemble the LGBTQI museum collection.

If after six months a suitable location is not found, the Council will help Qtopia find a suitable location to display the LGBTQI collection at a “stand-alone event” during World Pride 2023.

Significant historical relevance of Darlinghurst Police Station to the queer community

Qtopia Sydney, the group spearheading the opening of a queer museum in Sydney by WorldPride 2023, said the former police station in Darlinghurst was the preferred location for the museum.

The preferred location for the museum would be the former Darlinghurst Police Station, which is owned by the NSW Government.

The Council supports this location and has pledged to “advocate” on behalf of Qtopia for the New South Wales government to consider the proposal.

According to Fisher, Darlinghurst Police Station “has significant historical significance to the queer community. Not so long ago, homosexuals were thrown into cells. They are beaten just for being gay because it was illegal at the time. And so part of the healing process would be for this property to come to the LGBTQIA+ community.

Qtopia’s initiative has the backing and endorsement of former High Court judge Michael Kirby, publisher Ita Buttrose, LGBTQI rights advocate Ian Roberts, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander queer group BlaQ, Bobby Goldsmith Foundation, St Vincent’s Hospital and ACON.

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Volunteer Opportunities Available at Local Organizations | News, Sports, Jobs https://temescalartscenter.org/volunteer-opportunities-available-at-local-organizations-news-sports-jobs/ Sat, 14 May 2022 20:12:03 +0000 https://temescalartscenter.org/volunteer-opportunities-available-at-local-organizations-news-sports-jobs/ DYLAN BROWN/Standard-Examine file photo Kevin Kula plays piano on Wednesday, December 18, 2013 at Golden Hours Senior Center. Weber Human Services is looking for people who can help nonprofits in Northern Utah. For more information on volunteer opportunities or to post an opportunity for your organization, call 801-625-3777 or 801-778-6897. If you […]]]>

DYLAN BROWN/Standard-Examine file photo

Kevin Kula plays piano on Wednesday, December 18, 2013 at Golden Hours Senior Center.

Weber Human Services is looking for people who can help nonprofits in Northern Utah. For more information on volunteer opportunities or to post an opportunity for your organization, call 801-625-3777 or 801-778-6897.

If you are interested in volunteering and don’t see what interests you, please give us a call as we have many other opportunities available and we will help you find what interests you and best uses your skills. If your organization needs volunteers, don’t hesitate to give us a call.

  • Golden Hours Senior Center needs a Zumba instructor and a Spanish teacher. If you are interested in either position, contact Ginger at 801-629-8864.
  • Volunteer truck driver wanted for Habitat for Humanity of Weber and Davis counties. Volunteer to pick up furniture or other items. Two to three hours two to three days a week, especially Friday and Saturday, to pick up items from garage sales. Must be able to drive a 12ft box truck and have a valid Utah driver’s license. Contact Wendy at 814-470-1278 or wendy@habitatwd.org for more details.
  • Habitat for Humanity of Weber and Davis Counties is looking for volunteers to help with the Away from Home Preservation Program. This program provides exterior painting, yard cleaning and minor repair services to low-income homeowners. Volunteers are needed to qualify applicants and obtain labor and supplies for the program. Contact Wendy at 814-470-1278 or wendy@habitatwd.org for more details.
  • Weber County Senior Centers need help serving lunch. Hours and days vary by location — North View, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday through Friday; Ogden Valley, three to five hours Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.; Lake View, three to five hours Thursday, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.; Morgan, two to five hours Monday through Thursday.
  • Do you enjoy reading to others? Volunteers needed to go to nursing homes and read to residences. The reading group will go one day a week for about an hour.
  • The Senior Companion Program is looking for people 55 and older who live on a moderate to low income to serve as companions and friends to the homebound in the community. Mileage, training and a small monthly allowance are available.
  • Catholic Community Services offers volunteer opportunities in the pantry: setting up, distributing groceries to customers, stocking shelves, cleaning, and helping with other daily projects, Tuesday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. h; and at the warehouse: sorting of donations, bagging of products and other foodstuffs, Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.
  • Community service for all ages at the local food distribution center. Ogden Connection Center located at 789 2nd St., Ogden, will be hosting free grocery events and need help with food packaging and distribution. Call 801-675-8547 or email info@connectutah.org.
  • The Washington Terrace Senior Center needs someone to sit at the front desk to check people in for lunch and collect money on Mondays from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. They also need a teacher of ceramic experimented on Wednesdays and Fridays from 9 a.m. at noon.
  • United Way of Northern Utah is looking for volunteers who love children to help with the following opportunities: Welcome Baby Home Visitor volunteers to conduct monthly visits to educate parents on their baby’s developmental milestones; AEIOU tutors and mentors to work with students in schools one-on-one; and Learn With Playgroup volunteers to help or lead parent and child activities in their neighborhood. Fluency in Spanish is a plus but not a requirement. We ask for a commitment of two hours per month for at least six months for Welcome Baby, one hour per week for 30 weeks during the school year for AEIOU, and two hours per week for six months for Learn with Playgroup. Visit https://uwnu.org/get-involved, call Nicole Hopkinson at 801-399-5584 or email nhopkinson@uwnu.org to learn more.
  • The Adoptive Grandparents Program and RSVP Grandparents Programs in Weber, Davis, Morgan, and Box Elder Counties are looking for individuals ages 55 or older to volunteer as reading tutors for children in the primary who have fallen behind their class. Volunteers are placed in a school near their home and can serve between two and 20 hours a week. Monthly allowances and mileage reimbursements are available for those who qualify.
  • YCC is looking for volunteers to do gardening work around its establishment. Hours may vary. Contact Sandy at 801-689-1730.
  • Union Station Museums is looking for volunteers over the age of 16 to serve Saturdays from 12-4 p.m. at the John M. Browning Firearms Museum, Utah State Railroad Museum and at the Browning-Kimball Classic Car Museum.
  • The Circles program through OWCAP is looking for community members to volunteer as allies and help community members break the cycle of poverty. Allies are members of the community who wish to have a supportive and friendly relationship with a person or family enrolled in the Circles program. Volunteers will be required to attend a weekly evening meeting and be paired with participants to provide support. Volunteers are using Zoom right now.
  • Big Brothers Big Sisters is looking for volunteers. For more details, visit their site at bbbsu.org, click on Be a Big, then in the drop-down menu, click on Get Started. You will need to read and complete each step.
  • A bereavement center needs volunteers. We are a non-profit organization that works with children, teens and their families who are experiencing loss through death, divorce or separation. We train all new volunteers. Need volunteers to work in the office, give lessons to the children and do the cleaning. Please contact us for more information at 801-476-1127 or http://.familysummit.org.
  • The dinosaur park needs guides to talk about the rocks, volunteers to help in the lab, and to help with upcoming events.
  • Do you feel lonely and are 55 or older? Would you like someone to call you every week to visit you? If you want someone to call you, contact us.
  • Roads to Independence is looking for a volunteer Receptionist/Office Assistant. Need to complete 20-30 hours per week. Duties include answering the phone, filing and assisting the office manager.
  • The Ogden Nature Center, a 152-acre nonprofit nature preserve, is always looking for volunteers to help with various projects and events. Our current needs include grounds maintenance such as leaf raking, snow removal and trail trimming. Please contact Volunteer@ogdennaturecenter.org or visit www.ogdennaturecenter.org for more information.
  • The Hill Air Force Base Retiree Activities Office (RAO) is looking for retired military personnel or spouses of retired military personnel to volunteer in their office. Must be able to get on or off base and work with veterans who call in or come into the office. Hours Required: Monday through Friday, typically three-hour shifts, 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. or 12 p.m. to 3 p.m. Contact John Maginnis at 801-721-1625.
  • The Retired Seniors Volunteer Program (RSVP) is looking for people 55 years of age or older to volunteer at local non-profit organizations such as food banks, shelters, housing complexes, centers for seniors, wildlife centers, historical museums, schools and more. Mileage reimbursement authorized.
  • The Davis County area needs Meals on Wheels volunteers – drivers and runners. Monday to Friday, times may vary depending on the route; trips take about two hours, from 10 a.m. to noon. Contact Jennifer Chaffe at 801-525-5052 or email jchaffee@co.davis.ut.us.
  • The Red Cross is looking for volunteers throughout Utah. Here are two necessary positions. Blood Donor Ambassador (in person): Greet blood donors at blood drives using excellent customer service skills and ensure their check-in process is smooth. Or become a member of the recovery team (virtual position – yes, do it from home and still help people during disasters): you can apply for these positions or explore others at www.redcross.org/ volunteer, or email Julie.schwartz@redcross. org with your questions.
  • Weber County Archery Park is looking for volunteers to help with check-in, signing up for memberships, providing rental equipment, and assistance when needed. Call for information on days and times. No experience necessary.
  • Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) give a child a voice and change their story. Must be over 21 and able to pass a background check. For more information on how to volunteer, visit utahcasa.org.
  • The Weber County Sports Shooting Complex is seeking volunteers for the following positions: Range Safety Office and Range Reception/Cashier. Volunteers do not need to be certified but must have basic knowledge of firearms, gun safety and must complete a four hour course. Individuals must pass a background check and volunteer at least eight hours per month. Training to be provided.

SENIORS CENTER VOLUNTEERS

Volunteers are always welcome to help out at the senior center. There are a variety of volunteer opportunities such as classroom instructors, front desk help, support help, and humanitarian work. If you are interested in volunteering, please contact the senior center that interests you.



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WACM to Host 32nd Annual International Cuisine Dinner at Great Escape Lodge https://temescalartscenter.org/wacm-to-host-32nd-annual-international-cuisine-dinner-at-great-escape-lodge/ Thu, 12 May 2022 13:43:44 +0000 https://temescalartscenter.org/wacm-to-host-32nd-annual-international-cuisine-dinner-at-great-escape-lodge/ the World Consciousness Children’s Museum hold her 32n/a Annual International Cuisine Dinner on Sunday, May 22 from 4:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Six Flags Great Escape Lodge & Water Park in Queensbury. The event is the museum’s biggest fundraiser of the year and features a selection of international dishes prepared by area restaurant chefs. […]]]>

the World Consciousness Children’s Museum hold her 32n/a Annual International Cuisine Dinner on Sunday, May 22 from 4:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Six Flags Great Escape Lodge & Water Park in Queensbury. The event is the museum’s biggest fundraiser of the year and features a selection of international dishes prepared by area restaurant chefs.

Participating restaurants include Morgan and Co., Grateful Den, Raul’s Mexican Grill, Alif Cafe, Aroy Dee, Tandoori Grill, Rock Hill Bakehouse and Darling Donuts. The evening also includes a raffle, live auction and silent auction of goods donated by local and national organizations and businesses.

The theme for this year’s international cuisine dinner is “Thailand” in recognition of the museum’s latest interactive exhibit, “Thailand: Beauty and Beasts.” Tickets are $125 plus fees for adults and $110 plus fees for young professionals up to age 35. Tickets can be purchased online at ticketleap.com.

The event is sponsored by the following companies and organizations:

Iron Chef Level Sponsors:
AJA Architecture, Romeo Auto Group, Surfside on the Lake Hotel and Suites

Master Chef Level Sponsors:
Glens Falls National Bank & Trust Company, Griffin Lumber, New Country Porsche from Clifton Park

Chef Level Sponsors:
30 Lake, The Atrium Financial Group, Finch Paper, The Hub

Sous-chef level sponsors:
Marvin and Company, PC CPAs, New Country Lexus of Latham, Oak Tree Pediatric Dentistry

Sponsors at the chef de partie level:
Capital CFO+, Crandall Public Library, Edward Jones office of Steve Babson, Hot Yoga Queensbury, New Country Toyota of Clifton Park, Sustainable PR

The World Awareness Children’s Museum is a 501(c)(3) organization. Created in 1995, the Museum’s mission is to bring the diversity of the world to children. Its collection of more than 8,000 artifacts, including clothing, musical instruments, toys and more than 7,000 pieces of international children’s art, come from 140 countries.

The museum is located at 89 Warren Street, Glens Falls and is open for general admission four days a week from September to June. For more information on the International Cuisine Dinner and other Museum programs, visit WACM website.

Featured photo: The World Awareness Children’s Museum International Cuisine Dinner features dishes from around the world prepared by local chefs. Courtesy picture/WACM

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Christie Auctions Deinonychus Dinosaur Skeleton in New York https://temescalartscenter.org/christie-auctions-deinonychus-dinosaur-skeleton-in-new-york/ Mon, 09 May 2022 05:44:00 +0000 https://temescalartscenter.org/christie-auctions-deinonychus-dinosaur-skeleton-in-new-york/ Satyen Mohapatra Would you like to display the skeleton of a Raptor dinosaur in your living room? International auction house in New York, Christie’s will give you the opportunity to bid on Deinonychus antirrhopus on May 12, 2022. The estimated price is $4,000,000-6,000,000. The most expensive dinosaur skeleton sold to date is naturally a Tyrannosaurus […]]]>
Satyen Mohapatra

Would you like to display the skeleton of a Raptor dinosaur in your living room?

International auction house in New York, Christie’s will give you the opportunity to bid on Deinonychus antirrhopus on May 12, 2022.

The estimated price is $4,000,000-6,000,000.

MS Education Academy

The most expensive dinosaur skeleton sold to date is naturally a Tyrannosaurus rex, the largest carnivore on earth, known as ‘Stan’ which was brought back by an anonymous buyer in 2020 for the sum of 31.8 million U.S. dollars. Now, it is reported that Stan will be housed in the new Natural History Museum in Abu Dhabi, the capital of the United Arab Emirates.

It’s not the first time a dinosaur skeleton has been auctioned off, many dinosaur specimens have been sold at auction. Nearly five dinosaur skeletons fall under the hammer each year despite strong criticism from paleontologists that these rare specimens should not fall into private hands but remain in public bodies for research purposes.

In the United States, where most dinosaurs are found, laws allow the sale of specimens found on private property.

The current dinosaur Deinonychus antirrhopuits was found in a good state of preservation. It was excavated in Wolf Canyon, Carbon County, Montana several years ago.

It belongs to the Lower Cretaceous period around 115-108 million years ago.

Deinonychus is a highly agile predatory dinosaur that hunts in packs and was one of the most feared animals of its time.

A similar species like Deinonychus, Velociraptor has been seen in Michael Crichton’s Jurassic Park and The Lost World novels, or Steven Spielberg’s film adaptations.

Theraptor was seen running after children in a kitchen.

This dinosaur is named after the famous Trojan warrior “Hector”.

This is the most complete Deinonychus skeleton ever found. The name Deinonychus which means “terrible claw” was coined by paleontologist John Ostrom in 1969 because of the sharp deadly claw on each of the dinosaur’s feet.

Hector was excavated from Wolf Creek Canyon, Montana, from 2012 to 2014 and has since been in private hands, on display only once before, in Copenhagen at the Natural History Museum of Denmark. The King of Dinosaurs exhibit (2020-21) showed Hector alongside five other dinosaurs, including the iconic Tyrannosaurus rex.

Deinonychus belongs to the dinosaurs called theropods which are carnivorous animals that can walk on two legs. These sickle predators could deliver a lethal kick.

Deinonychus stood on one leg, held his target with his long arms, then killed it with a mighty kick. It could stand on its hind legs when attacking other dinosaurs, its long tail aiding its balance and posture.

Deinonychus stretched this tail horizontally when running, which contributed to the exceptional length of this animal, about three meters long in total.

Its large skull was light and had a number of openings giving Deinonychus great speed and maneuverability while running.

It had large eyes and 60 or 70 extremely sharp teeth which gave it its deadly bite.

As the first raptor of the Deinonychus species, it represents one of the most important paleontological discoveries of the 20th century. Hector can now be added as the most complete individual Deinonychus ever found.

Deinonychus was positively identified by Ostrom who studied its fossils found in 1964 and established their connection to birds. From an evolutionary perspective, Deinonychus was found to be closer to that of a bird than to any other reptile-like dinosaur.

Unlike dinosaurs and other reptiles which were slow moving, Deinonychus was agile and intelligent. The discovery sparked a debate about the links between dinosaurs and the origin of birds.

The first fossilized remains of Deinonychus were recovered from the Cloverly Formation in southern Montana by paleontologist Barnum Brown in 1931.

Brown found a small carnivorous dinosaur skeleton like that of a Tenontosaurus; however, because it was coated in lime and therefore difficult to prepare, he never exhibited it. It wasn’t until 1969 that John Ostrom and his assistant, Grant Meyer, re-examined it in detail and identified it as Deinonychus.

This specimen is now housed in the American Museum of Natural History in New York and is the second most complete Deinonychus skeleton, after Hector.

In August 1964, Ostrom and Meyer led an expedition from Yale’s Peabody Museum of Natural History to a newly discovered quarry in the Cloverly Formation. Here they found about a thousand bones of various Deinonychus, but no complete skeletons. They could only determine two feet from the same source – it became the type specimen of the species. The remaining bones have been cataloged at Yale’s Peabody Museum.

A Harvard University expedition to Montana in 1974 led by Steven Orzack unearthed more bones crucial to understanding Deinonychus, including the femurs, pubis, sacrum, ilia, pes, and metatarsus. . These are housed in the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard University.

To this handful of recorded specimens found over the decades, with only two complete skeletons – both in museum collections – Hector can now be added as the most complete individual of Deinonychus ever found.

Our current view of Deinonychus is a feathered animal.

He noted that the agility, high activity level, and sensitivity to stimuli of Deinonychus was closer to that of a bird than a reptile, as most dinosaurs were categorized.

He proposed that Deinonychus was warm-blooded like a bird, and argued that it shared many other characteristics of flightless birds, including long legs, a long neck, a horizontal body, and potentially feathers.

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Peggy Smith-McAlister is the general manager of the Boys and; Rusk County Girls Club in Henderson, Texas | Visit Tyler Texas https://temescalartscenter.org/peggy-smith-mcalister-is-the-general-manager-of-the-boys-and-rusk-county-girls-club-in-henderson-texas-visit-tyler-texas/ Thu, 05 May 2022 13:32:33 +0000 https://temescalartscenter.org/peggy-smith-mcalister-is-the-general-manager-of-the-boys-and-rusk-county-girls-club-in-henderson-texas-visit-tyler-texas/ Tour Tyler Texas – All Nations TV – M1Y – Empowerment Community Development Corporation and the Texas African American Museum by Clarence Edmond Shackelford (c) 2022: Peggy Smith-McAlister is the general manager of the Boys and; Girls Club of Rusk County in Henderson, Texas, a position she has held for 16 years. Peggy graduated from […]]]>

Tour Tyler Texas – All Nations TV – M1Y – Empowerment Community Development Corporation and the Texas African American Museum by Clarence Edmond Shackelford (c) 2022:

Peggy Smith-McAlister is the general manager of the Boys and; Girls Club of Rusk County in Henderson, Texas, a position she has held for 16 years. Peggy graduated from Henderson High School and earned a BS in Business Administration from Texas College in 2003.

Visit Tyler Texas– Photo image submitted to M1Y

She began her career at the Boys and Girls Club of Rusk County in 2005 growing the organization to serve over 1,500 youth and growing the organization from one club to five clubs and a budget of $250,000. with a budget of $750,000.00 in 2020.

Peggy is also a Fellow of the Global Institute of Leadership Development, Stanford University Nonprofit Management Institute and a graduate of the BGCA Advanced Leadership Program. Peggy is a Learning Coach and Level 1 National Trainer for BGCA. Deeply committed to her community, she is a member of the Henderson Leadership Class of 2008 and Rusk County Chamber of Commerce Louise Jacks Woman of the Year 2007.

She also received the Rusk County 2013 Female Dr. Martin Luther King Humanitarian Award. Peggy is a board member of several local non-profit organizations including Cultural Arts Social Club (Chair), Henderson Independent School District Innovation Committee, Rusk County Black History (Treasurer) Community Development Corporation and Campground Cemetery (Chair).

Professionally, Peggy is a member of the National Board of the National Boys and; Girls Club Professional Association and is secretary of the Northeast Texas Professional Association within Boys & Girls Clubs of America; she was named the 2015 Southwest Region Contributor to the Profession award. His collaborations with various local organizations in Rusk County have led to innovative initiatives for his local clubs.

Peggy is also an honored member of the Stanford Who’s Who Black Book. Inclusion is limited to individuals who have demonstrated outstanding leadership or achievement in their profession, industry or profession. Member of Phi Sigma Pi and the National Leadership and Success Society.

A lifelong resident of Rusk County, Peggy Smith-McAlister is married to Randy McAlister and has six adult children and five grandchildren. She is a member of Arlem Grove Baptist Church, where she serves as church secretary.

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Visit Tyler Texas– Photo by M1Y – Clarence Shackelford TEXT 903.253.5099 – for Tour Tyler Texas

  • Tour Tyler Texas is more than sightseeing. http://TourTylerTexas.org
  • Tour Tyler Texas, under the auspices of the nonprofit Empowerment Community Development Corporation, which is a community organization located at 309 W. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd 75702

LeRoy Francis Sr. dba Community Funeral Home Tyler

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Visit Tyler Texas– Photo by M1Y – Clarence Shackelford TEXT 903.253.5099 – for Tour Tyler Texas

Community Empowerment Development Corporation / http://EmpowermentCDC.org is a 501(c) non-profit organization focused on education, arts, tourism, veterans services, scholarship, youth mentoring, preservation of history, community development , housing and economic empowerment.

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Check out 37 Broadway and stage favorites who dazzled at the 2022 Met Gala https://temescalartscenter.org/check-out-37-broadway-and-stage-favorites-who-dazzled-at-the-2022-met-gala/ Tue, 03 May 2022 17:21:45 +0000 https://temescalartscenter.org/check-out-37-broadway-and-stage-favorites-who-dazzled-at-the-2022-met-gala/ Ariana DeBose, Cynthia Erivo, Michaela Jaé Rodriguez, Jaquel Spivey and more attended the avant-garde event on May 2. The Met Gala, one of fashion’s biggest nights and often called the first Monday in May, returned to its usual place in the calendar on May 2. Like Broadway, the event has been impacted by the pandemic […]]]>

Ariana DeBose, Cynthia Erivo, Michaela Jaé Rodriguez, Jaquel Spivey and more attended the avant-garde event on May 2.

The Met Gala, one of fashion’s biggest nights and often called the first Monday in May, returned to its usual place in the calendar on May 2.

Like Broadway, the event has been impacted by the pandemic for the past two years with a cancellation in 2020 and a postponement to September in 2021. Its return in 2022 has seen the fashion gala welcome many stage favourites. Arts and entertainment celebrities celebrated the new “In America: An Anthology of Fashion” exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art at an evening co-chaired by Lin-Manuel Miranda, Blake Lively, Ryan Reynolds and Regina King. This year’s theme was Gilded Glamour, an approach to 19th century fashion through a modern perspective with a white tie dress code.

Take a look at all the veterans of the scene, from Broadway to the West End, and the performers who bring the theater to the big screen dressed in brand new for the evening’s red carpet.

1. Christine Baranski

2. Jon Batiste

3. Denee Benton

4. Dove Cameron

5. Sabrina Charpentier

6. Gemma Chan

7. Jessica Chastain

8. Glenn Close

9. James Corden and Julia Carey

10. Kieran Culkin

11. Claire Danes and Hugh Dancy

12. Ariana DeBose

13. Cynthia Erivo

14. Renee Elise Goldsberry

15. Danai Gurira

16. Vanessa Hudgens

17.Oscar Isaac

18. Hugh Jackman and Deborra-Lee Furness

19. Louisa Jacobson

20. Lily James

21. James McAvoy and Anne Marie Duff

22. Lin-Manuel Miranda and Vanessa Nadal

23. Chloe Moretz

24. Carey Mulligan

25. Leslie Odom, Jr.

26. Ashley Park

27. Sarah Jessica Parker

28. Ben Platt

29. Anthony Ramos

30. Olivia Rodrigo

31. Michaela Jae Rodriguez

32. Jordan Roth

33. Amy Schumer

34. Jaquel Spivey

35. Emma Stone

36. Kerry Washington

37. Maisie Williams

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