Museum architecture http://temescalartscenter.org/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 11:36:55 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://temescalartscenter.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-1.png Museum architecture http://temescalartscenter.org/ 32 32 BDP restores London’s Leighton House museum https://temescalartscenter.org/bdp-restores-londons-leighton-house-museum/ Mon, 10 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://temescalartscenter.org/bdp-restores-londons-leighton-house-museum/ BDP’s skillful redesign of Leighton House has breathed new life into one of London’s forgotten museums, the former home of artist Frederic Leighton. Rear elevation showing new brick staircase, glassed-in cafe and renovated winter studio (ph: Jaron James) BDP has completed the restoration and refurbishment of the Grade II* listed Leighton House Museum in London. […]]]>

BDP’s skillful redesign of Leighton House has breathed new life into one of London’s forgotten museums, the former home of artist Frederic Leighton.

Rear elevation showing new brick staircase, glassed-in cafe and renovated winter studio (ph: Jaron James)

BDP has completed the restoration and refurbishment of the Grade II* listed Leighton House Museum in London. The £8million project includes a new entrance, gallery, learning center and cafe, as well as significantly improved accessibility in the form of a spiral staircase and lift.

Designed by George Aitchison and located on the edge of Holland Park in Kensington, the original building dates back to 1866 and was home to painter Frederic Leighton. The artist, in collaboration with Aitchison, extended the building over a period of 30 years, including the two-storey Arab Room and the Winter Workshop on the first floor. After Leighton’s death, the house became a museum and received other modifications, including the Perrin wing, added in the 1920s, and a large substandard post-war infill extension below the winter studio.

Buildings.

View from the reception towards the café and the garden (ph: Dirk Lindner)

BDP has taken a restrained approach aimed at re-establishing the original intent of the house and museum. “It was a question of removing and judging what should be added, particularly with regard to the layout of the building’s garden, which is surrounded by artists’ houses from the same period”, explains David Artis, director by architect BDP. “It’s about making subtle interventions that don’t detract from the overall legibility of the building.”

Buildings.

The cafe is located below the Winter Studio, replacing a substandard infill extension from the 1950s (ph: Dirk Lindner)

At the center of the project is a new basement of 180 square meters located below the entrance and which houses the museum archives, a gallery and toilets. It also connects to the building’s existing basement, which now includes a learning center; unlock the blueprint and allow the rooms in the house above to return to their original function. “This key move allows the whole house to breathe,” says Artis.

Plan of the ground floor and the basement

Unlike its former home under the Winter Studio, the new archive provides a safe, climate-controlled environment for the museum’s treasures. The basement lobby, which contains additional exhibit space and restroom access, is lined with wood, providing a warm and tactile aesthetic.

An elevator and a steel spiral staircase connect the basement to the renovated entrance on the ground floor and the winter studio on the first floor. The latter is housed in a carefully detailed brick enclosure which complements a large semi-circular brick bay on the opposite side of the house and neatly completes the dominant east-west axis across the plan. A dark brown brick was chosen for this new addition, subtly differentiating it from the historic red brick facades of the house, while complementing the newer Perrin wing.

Buildings.

New basement showing Holland Park Circle storefront (ph: Dirk Lindner)

“The staircase is a recessive piece, which is visually separated from the winter workshop and allows the original rear elevation to be clearly read,” explains Artis. “The details are inspired by the Arabic room and aim to add visual richness without being too explicit.” Hand-painted on the interior walls of the staircase, an 11-meter-tall mural by Iranian artist Shahrzad Ghaffari is the museum’s first contemporary artwork to be on permanent display.

Buildings.

The basement gallery features Leighton’s drawings and sketches (ph: Dirk Lindner)

The remodeled entrance and reception area restored the building’s existing entrance hall, complete with works of art: a large painting from Domenico Tintoretto’s studio, which was part of the original collection of Leighton. A separate private entrance used by the artist’s models was also revealed.

The new entry space and adjacent cafe are articulated by a suite of specially hand-commissioned furniture by Syrian artisans based in Amman, Jordan. In the cafe, cast iron columns supporting the winter workshop above have been revealed – having been encased in brick in the 1950s – and painted a rich green. Floor-to-ceiling glazing connects this space to the garden and surrounding homes.

The curved staircase wall is lined with ‘Oneness’, an 11-metre-high artwork by Shahrzad Ghaffari (ph: Dirk Lindner)

On the first floor, the winter studio has been carefully restored with the existing Georgian wired glass replaced with ultra-thin insulating glazing placed in the original frames. Double glazing could not be used as the elements would have been too heavy for the existing ironwork.

The Perrin Wing features a new upper level personnel ‘bridge’ and has had an initial fabric thermal upgrade, including a new roof and insulation. Regarding environmental control, the architect audited the entire collection of the museum before putting in place a strategy that would ensure the future preservation of the building and its precious contents.

Exterior view of the staircase (ph: Dirk Lindner)

Outside, richly colored oversized earthenware tiles mark the new entrance – a nod to the fine ceramics on display in the Arab Room and the work of Halsey Ricardo, architect of the Perrin Wing. “The earthenware is designed to give more prominence to the new entrance, while remaining slightly ambiguous as to whether it is modern or ancient,” says Artis. “The architecture is ‘by Leighton’ without being overtly modern, which in many ways sums up our approach to the whole project.”

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Evolution of museum architecture after the pandemic https://temescalartscenter.org/evolution-of-museum-architecture-after-the-pandemic/ Mon, 29 Aug 2022 05:01:53 +0000 https://temescalartscenter.org/evolution-of-museum-architecture-after-the-pandemic/ As museums have been forced to close and implement new security measures during the COVID-19 pandemic, it is no exaggeration to predict that future museum architecture could take advantage of this to evolve. Given the negative effects a pandemic can have on the art industry, it is likely that many architects and artists will proactively […]]]>

As museums have been forced to close and implement new security measures during the COVID-19 pandemic, it is no exaggeration to predict that future museum architecture could take advantage of this to evolve. Given the negative effects a pandemic can have on the art industry, it is likely that many architects and artists will proactively devise preventative solutions to ensure the continued enjoyment of in-person art exhibitions.

Lobby

Although most museums offer the option of purchasing tickets online or through a kiosk, this does not eliminate the need for lobby spaces and ticket check lines. According to a Smithsonian Magazine interview with Bea Spolidoro, a WELL-certified architect and director at FisherARCHitecture in Pittsburgh, architects are likely to begin to move towards incorporating outdoor spaces into lobbies, “Being outdoors is always better than being indoors in terms of the particles that spread around… But at the same time, in windy conditions particles can spread, so museums with courtyards could be another design solution that can keep people outside with less wind for spread germs.

Additionally, as AR technology continues to advance, museum architecture is likely to evolve toward spacious exterior designs. In 2021, the National Gallery in London created an outdoor installation in central London that allowed people to activate artwork on their phone using a QR code. At Immersive Van Gogh Experience in Pittsburgh, the entrance lines were structured to be outdoors and the indoor exhibition hall was spaced out on the floors using benches and circle projections on the floor. It is possible that future museums will incorporate specific architectural elements such as tile patterns or carpet squares designed to indicate the six-foot marker.

“Super sad vinyl sheets…or painter’s tape on the floor, that’s a wartime fix for when you really have to,” Spolidoro says. “But when you think about design, it would be a different approach, more thoughtful about the patterns and the volumes of the architecture. Museums could be designed as a more experiential environment.

Photo: Van Gogh Immersive Experience in Pittsburgh

Souvenir shop

The gift shop is a problematic source for spreading germs as it is common for visitors to pick up items and put them back on the shelf. One suggestion from Spolidoro is to design the gift shop as a museum itself, not allowing items to be handled by customers, and to build a pick-up window at the end where people can order items. Additionally, items from the gift shop could be displayed in the rest of the museum with exhibits, customers can place orders for the items by scanning a QR code with their phone, and then they can collect their items upon exiting the museum.

Museum Architecture Post-Pandemic Wall Text

exhibition design

Museum architecture typically contains large, open rooms with artwork lining most of the surrounding walls. On crowded museum days, the lack of adequate space between artworks is not very conducive to social distancing. Not only will future museums likely be designed to keep artworks further apart, but they could also favor more traffic control measures in their design to eliminate overcrowding.

One of the biggest challenges in exhibit design is displaying text on the walls, which can be a nuisance when it comes to social distancing. According to Michael Govan, director of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) and a leader in exploring how the public interacts with art, one possible solution could be mobile and digital displays like videos or brochures that you can experience before or during exhibitions that provide the necessary information on the different parts.

As art continues to become more accessible through virtual museum experiences, museum architects must evolve and design spaces where patrons can feel comfortable experiencing and enjoying art in person.

For more information on the architecture, see the first net zero cityLA’s newest SkyscraperHow? ‘Or’ What AI programs help architectsand buildings inspired by nature.

Discover it world of creationand discover the history of calligraphy, anamorphosis artand pottery.

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“The Modern Chair” at the Palm Springs Art Museum Architecture and Design Center – COOL HUNTING® https://temescalartscenter.org/the-modern-chair-at-the-palm-springs-art-museum-architecture-and-design-center-cool-hunting/ Mon, 29 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://temescalartscenter.org/the-modern-chair-at-the-palm-springs-art-museum-architecture-and-design-center-cool-hunting/ Each year throughout the greater Palm Springs area, Modernism Week celebrates mid-century architecture and design through events, tours and exhibits. During the recent preview weekend (offering a preview of the upcoming event in February 2022), a double-decker bus tour passed palm trees and tall hedges to reveal examples of significant mid-century marvels . Upon ascending […]]]>

Each year throughout the greater Palm Springs area, Modernism Week celebrates mid-century architecture and design through events, tours and exhibits. During the recent preview weekend (offering a preview of the upcoming event in February 2022), a double-decker bus tour passed palm trees and tall hedges to reveal examples of significant mid-century marvels . Upon ascending the stairs of the bus, passengers were presented with a glossary of modernist design terms. First on the list: “adaptive reuse,” a designation made during the transformation of the 1961 E Stewart Williams Santa Fe Savings and Loan Building on Palm Canyon Drive. In 2014, Marmol Radziner fully restored this classic structure, which now houses the Palm Springs Art Museum Architecture and Design Center. Currently inside this Class 1 Historic Site (as designated by the Palm Springs City Council) is an exhibit titled The modern chair.

We spoke with curator Brad Dunning as well as Eames Office Manager Eames Demetrios to better understand how the exhibition was organized and to learn more about the importance of chairs in the evolution of the contemporary architecture and furniture design.

Courtesy of Lance Gerber

First, Dunning was – perhaps unsurprisingly – inspired by the Williams building. “Space is like a shiny white box. White terrazzo floors bounce with light. The white ceiling reflects the light downwards. White translucent solar shades filter light through the all-glass walls. It really is the closest Palm Springs has to a Farnsworth home or a Case Study 22 home.” he says. “It actually looks more like a miniature of Mies’ Berlin Neue Nationalgalerie, except it’s all white.”

Courtesy of Lance Gerber

For the exhibition, Dunning chose 50 examples of 20th-century chairs to illustrate the evolution of contemporary chair design, beginning with Thonet’s B9 bentwood chair from the early 1900s. chairs on continuous low pedestals, chronologically all spaced the same distance, facing the viewer clinically so that they appear equally prominent in the presentation. I wanted everything to be abandoned, so that everything was white except the chairs themselves,” he says. Beyond Thonet, the galleries feature chairs by Charles and Ray Eames, Rudolph Schindler, Charlotte Perriand for Le Corbusier, Pierre Paulin, Olivier Mourgue, Eileen Gray, George Nakashima and many more, with a central room showcasing chairs Californian designers.

“I like the fact that the exhibition starts with the Thonet chair,” Demetrios tells us. “If you look at it as a continuum, you look at these chairs as a way of molding wood in one line. Then you look at the Aalto chairs and it’s two-dimensional. And then you have the Charles and Ray chairs that add that third dimension. Choosing to start with the Thonet chair weighs how materiality has affected the modern movement and this awareness of new materials. Ray and Charles wanted to understand how these materials could make chairs more useful for people. And useful can be beautiful.

Courtesy of Lance Gerber

When asked to look at the museum’s collection of chairs, Dunning was surprised by the number of unique and varied examples. “They had a Terje Ekström in exceptionally fine condition and one from one of my favourites, avant-garde French designer Roger Tallon. They showed me one of the most beautiful and original “round” chairs by Hans Wegner that I have ever seen. The original caning and patina are just perfect,” he says. But he felt the museum was missing some key pieces that should be part of the exhibit, which he borrowed from various collectors and museums. “I was delighted to show a rare and antique RM Schindler chair from 1926, from the collection, but to tell the story of the modern chair, you have to show a Breuer Wassily armchair, a Saarinen tulip and a Barcelona Mies.”

Tokujin Yoshioka “Honey-Pop Chair”, image courtesy of Yoshihiro Makino

There are several highlights to see here. Harry Bertoia’s Welded Wire Side Chair is loved for its innovative airy structure. Designed in 1926 by Eileen Gray, the Bibendum armchair (named after the mascot of the Michelin man) features soft, plush leather curves. The aforementioned Ekström chair from 1972 stuns onlookers, incorporating metal tubing covered in polyurethane foam. Tokujin Yoshioka’s somewhat ghostly Honey-Pop Chair has been meticulously crafted from glassine paper.

Constructed of nickel-plated steel, leather and horsehair, only two of Mies van der Rohe’s Barcelona armchairs were made for the German Pavilion at the 1929 Barcelona Exposition. This luxurious and elegant design is considered a masterpiece. modern workmanship of construction, elegance and ergonomic comfort. .

Verner Panton “Heart Cone Chair” (left) Rudolph Schindler “Cantilevered Armchair” (right), images courtesy of Yoshihiro Makino

Looking through the light-filled space also reveals how designers have used color beautifully – from Verner Panton’s bright red Heart Cone Chair (1959) to Gerrit Rietveld’s painted Red Blue Chair (1923) and doorway armchair. moss green overhang by Rudolph Schindler (circa 1926-1940).

The modern chair is ongoing through April 3, 2022. Modernism Week runs from February 12-27, 2022 and will include neighborhood tours, highlighting properties such as Frank Sinatra’s Movie Colony, Frey House, Lautner Compound , as well as numerous events and exhibitions. Visitors who see The modern chair at the museum can then find examples around the city in homes featuring classic mid-century modern pieces.

Heroic image of Pierre Paulin’s Artifort Ribbon chair and ottoman courtesy of Yoshihiro Makino

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“The Modern Chair” at the Architecture and Design Center of the Palm Springs Art Museum – COOL HUNTING® https://temescalartscenter.org/the-modern-chair-at-the-architecture-and-design-center-of-the-palm-springs-art-museum-cool-hunting/ Mon, 29 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://temescalartscenter.org/the-modern-chair-at-the-architecture-and-design-center-of-the-palm-springs-art-museum-cool-hunting/ [ad_1] Every year in the greater Palm Springs area, Modernism Week celebrates mid-century architecture and design through events, tours, and exhibits. During the recent preview weekend (offering a preview of the upcoming February 2022 event), a double-decker bus tour passed palm trees and tall hedges to reveal examples of significant mid-century wonders. . As they […]]]>


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Every year in the greater Palm Springs area, Modernism Week celebrates mid-century architecture and design through events, tours, and exhibits. During the recent preview weekend (offering a preview of the upcoming February 2022 event), a double-decker bus tour passed palm trees and tall hedges to reveal examples of significant mid-century wonders. . As they climbed the stairs of the bus, passengers were given a glossary of Modernist design terms. First on the list: “adaptive reuse,” a designation made during the transformation of the 1961 E Stewart Williams Santa Fe savings and loan building on Palm Canyon Drive. In 2014, Marmol Radziner completely restored this classic structure, which now houses the Palm Springs Art Museum Architecture and Design Center. Currently visible inside this historic Class 1 site (as designated by the Palm Springs City Council) is an exhibit titled The modern chair.

We spoke with curator Brad Dunning and Eames office manager Eames Demetrios to gain a better understanding of how the exhibition was organized and to learn more about the importance of chairs in the evolution of contemporary architecture and of furniture design.

Courtesy of Lance Gerber

First of all, Dunning was, unsurprisingly, inspired by the Williams building. “Space is like a glowing white box. White terrazzo floors bounce back. The white ceiling bounces the light downwards. White translucent solar shades filter light through fully glazed walls. It’s really the closest Palm Springs has to a Farnsworth home or a Case Study 22 home. ”He says. “Actually, it looks more like a mini from Mies’ Berlin Neue Nationalgalerie, except all white.”

Courtesy of Lance Gerber

For the exhibit, Dunning chose 50 examples of 20th century chairs to illustrate the evolution of contemporary chair design, starting with Thonet’s B9 bentwood chair from the early 1900s. chairs on low continuous pedestals, chronologically, all spaced the same distance, facing the viewer clinically so that they have the same importance in the presentation. I wanted everything to give up, so that everything was white except the chairs themselves, ”he says. Beyond Thonet, galleries feature chairs by Charles and Ray Eames, Rudolph Schindler, Charlotte Perriand for Le Corbusier, Pierre Paulin, Olivier Mourgue, Eileen Gray, George Nakashima and more, with a central room featuring chairs by Californian designers .

“I like the fact that the exhibition begins with the Thonet chair,” Demetrios tells us. “If you think of it as a continuum, you think of these chairs as a way to mold wood in line. Then you look at the Aalto chairs and it’s two-dimensional. And then you have Charles and Ray’s chairs which add that third dimension. By choosing to start from the Thonet chair, it forces us to weigh the way in which materiality has affected the modern movement and this awareness of new materials. Ray and Charles wanted to understand how these materials could make better chairs more useful for people. And useful can be beautiful.

Courtesy of Lance Gerber

When asked to look at the museum’s collection of chairs, Dunning was surprised at the number of unique and varied examples. “They had a Terje Ekström in exceptionally good condition and a favorite of mine, the avant-garde French designer Roger Tallon. They showed me one of the most beautiful and original Hans Wegner “round” chairs I have ever seen. The original cane and patina are just perfect, ”he says. But he felt the museum was missing key pieces that should be part of the exhibit, which he borrowed from various collectors and museums. “I was delighted to show a rare and antique RM Schindler chair from 1926, from the collection, but to tell the story of the modern chair you have to show a Breuer Wassily chair, a Saarinen tulip and a Mies Barcelona.”

Tokujin Yoshioka “Honey-Pop Chair”, image courtesy of Yoshihiro Makino

There are several standouts on the view here. Harry Bertoia’s welded wire side chair is popular for its innovative airy structure. Eileen Gray’s 1926 design, the Bibendum armchair (named after the Michelin man’s mascot) features inviting, supple, plush leather curves. The aforementioned Ekström chair from 1972 stuns viewers, incorporating metal tubing covered in polyurethane foam. Tokujin Yoshioka’s somewhat ghostly Honey-Pop chair has been meticulously crafted from glassine paper.

Constructed from nickel-plated steel, leather and horsehair, only two of Mies van der Rohe’s Barcelona chairs were made for the German pavilion at the Barcelona Exhibition of 1929. This luxurious and elegant design is considered a modern masterpiece of construction, elegance and ergonomic comfort. .

Verner Panton “Heart Cone Chair” (left) Rudolph Schindler “Cantilevered Armchair” (right), images courtesy of Yoshihiro Makino

Looking through the light space also reveals how designers have used color beautifully, from the vibrant red Heart Cone chair by Verner Panton (1959) to the painted Red Blue Chair by Gerrit Rietveld (1923) and the moss green cantilevered chair. by Rudolph Schindler (circa 1926-1940).

The modern chair is running until April 3, 2022. Modernism Week will run from February 12-27, 2022 and will include neighborhood tours, showcasing properties such as Frank Sinatra’s Film Colony, Frey House, Resort Lautner, as well as numerous events and exhibitions. Visitors who see The modern chair at the museum can then find examples around town in homes featuring classic mid-century modern pieces.

Hero image of Pierre Paulin’s Artifort ribbon chair and ottoman courtesy of Yoshihiro Makino

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The PS Art Museum Architecture & Design Center reopens its doors with the exhibition “The Modern Chair” https://temescalartscenter.org/the-ps-art-museum-architecture-design-center-reopens-its-doors-with-the-exhibition-the-modern-chair/ Thu, 26 Aug 2021 13:47:43 +0000 https://temescalartscenter.org/the-ps-art-museum-architecture-design-center-reopens-its-doors-with-the-exhibition-the-modern-chair/ [ad_1] The Architecture and Design Center, Edwards Harris Pavilion will reopen with The Modern Chair exhibition which follows a chronology of the development of the modern chair starting with the famous Thonet “B-9” bentwood armchair (circa 1905), which is widely considered the first modern chair. Le Corbusier used it frequently in his early architectures as […]]]>


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The Architecture and Design Center, Edwards Harris Pavilion will reopen with The Modern Chair exhibition which follows a chronology of the development of the modern chair starting with the famous Thonet “B-9” bentwood armchair (circa 1905), which is widely considered the first modern chair. Le Corbusier used it frequently in his early architectures as there was no other modern furniture readily available at the time. The modern chair will trace the evolution from the first cantilevered example of Mart Stam, on to the designs of the present times.
Technological and stylistic advancements have driven chair design forward at breakneck speed in the 20th century like never before. The exhibition will also contain important examples from the 21st century.

This exhibition is organized by the Palm Springs Art Museum and curated by Brad Dunning, specialist in architecture and design, with the support of Rochelle Steiner.

Main sponsorship of this exhibition provided by Elizabeth Edwards Harris and Trina Turk.

Funded by Allred Collaborative, Geoffrey De Sousa & José Manuel Alorda, Melissa Morgan Fine Art, Mimi & Steve Fisher, David Knaus & Mark Ingram, Sarah McElroy, Tim Prendergast & Christopher Mizeski (Christopher Anthony Ltd.), Modern Hacienda, Palm Springs Life, Ronnie Sassoon & James Crump, Bonnie Serkin & Will Emery, Cindra & Rod Stolk.

Additional funding is also provided by Fred & Nancy Baron, Robert Campbell – Realtor & Donald Daniels, Jane Emison & Mike Tierney, Amanda & Michael Erlinger, Robert D. Kleinschmidt, Nancy Sinatra, Rebecca & Phillip Smith.

This season’s exhibitions are sponsored by the Herman & Faye Sarkowsky Charitable Foundation and Yvonne & Steve * Maloney.

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Will COVID-19 change the architecture of museums? – American Alliance of Museums https://temescalartscenter.org/will-covid-19-change-the-architecture-of-museums-american-alliance-of-museums/ Fri, 28 Aug 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://temescalartscenter.org/will-covid-19-change-the-architecture-of-museums-american-alliance-of-museums/ [ad_1] As they design the buildings for the museum of the future, architects and engineers wonder what lasting impacts the pandemic will have. Photo credit: Buro Happold Go to the beginning of the article Here’s a happy thought: COVID-19 will – at some point – recede, and like pandemics of the past, that will be […]]]>


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As they design the buildings for the museum of the future, architects and engineers wonder what lasting impacts the pandemic will have. Photo credit: Buro Happold

Here’s a happy thought: COVID-19 will – at some point – recede, and like pandemics of the past, that will be history, another story to be told. But once the disease is gone, will any of the effects persist, maybe even forever? People speculated so much, forecasting positive forecasts and negative effects on our economy, our public policies and our professional and social life.

In the museum realm, many questioned whether some of the programming and exhibition adaptations would be maintained, with more availability online and an increased emphasis on serving the local community. But what about the physical presences of the museums themselves: their buildings? Will they be redesigned and reoriented to follow suit?

To find out, we spoke with architects and engineers from two leading firms: Cooper Robertson, known for projects like the Whitney Museum and Studio Museum in Harlem, and Buro Happold, a contributor to projects like the Academy. Museum of Motion Pictures and the Louvre. Abu Dhabi. Here’s what they had to say about pandemic planning.


Beyond measures to create a safe environment for visitors and staff after the reopening, institutions all assess the status quo and look for opportunities in times of crisis.

Financial challenges are prompting reconsideration of planned expansions. In some cases, we are asked to look at incremental expansions that may better align with reduced funding projections. In other cases, there is a desire to wait and see the long-term impact of the virus before moving forward with future plans that may need to reflect new or changed strategic goals.

It is questioned whether attendance will continue to be an important indicator of museum growth, which has implications for space. Financial pressures are forcing museums to think about how to use their existing spaces more effectively and whether growth is necessarily the best way forward. Many of our recent museum planning projects have focused on existing spaces, finding ways to correct mistakes made in previous expansions. At the same time, the emphasis on online content has enabled museums to reach increasingly larger audiences than is generally possible in their physical space. Online engagement is expected to encourage, among other benefits, more and more diverse in-person visits over the long term.

Working from home has clear benefits for the environment and working life. More flexible working arrangements are likely to stay here and should reduce the need for offices and workspaces for on-site staff. Some of these existing spaces could be reallocated, while the need for space for expanded staff could decrease.

There is greater interest in strengthening ties to the outdoors with spaces for art exhibitions, programs and meals. This is linked to a wider trend to focus on spaces that promote a sense of health and well-being.

A building whose facade extends into an exterior pavilion
Grace Farms in New Canaan, Connecticut. Photo credit: Buro Happold

There are concerns about how gathering spaces – classrooms, theaters and event spaces – may continue to provide important sources of revenue for museums as social distancing remains necessary. Museums have sought new sponsorship that can support the use of gathering spaces for temporary artist programs or for performances without an audience or with a socially distant audience that are broadcast online, although the potential to generate income. for these activities seem limited. Spaces with the inherent flexibility to move from a conference or event room to art spaces or other uses may respond better in the future, including unexpected changes such as those imposed by COVID- 19.

In addition to their responses to COVID-19, social justice movements have forced museums to prioritize how they can better reflect and engage with their communities. These actions could modify the balance of space needs. Although already a feature of many recent museum expansions, physical spaces will emphasize a greater sense of welcome and community, which can be expressed by emphasizing flexible public spaces, transparency between interior and exterior and the principles of universal design.

A lobby with a round design and floor-to-ceiling glass walls
The Gateway Arch Museum in Saint-Louis. Photo credit: Nic Lehoux

We have seen many and varied ideas for reopening museums, including some from cultural and entertainment venues like the Barbican Center in London. These ideas offer potential avenues for museums that go beyond the current baseline, which typically involves following state ordinances and guidelines and can lead to very generic solutions: reduced occupancy, for example. example, with a timed ticket office, timed outings and contactless tours throughout. These offer some level of short-term risk reduction, but they are figuratively and literally sanitized, creating a much more sterile cultural experience. Additionally, most museums do not offer food and in many cases no toilets or trash cans, and no group tours, which also highlights the existential challenges resulting from a purely out-of-the-way approach. short term: cafes and gift shops are vital sources of income for a large number of institutions, for example. How many can survive without these spaces?

At Buro Happold, our perspective is to work with museums to explore beyond that. We ask, “How can we provide additional and different means to help institutions reopen, and not just follow prescriptive guidelines?” Indeed, for many museums (some of them are our clients), operating at lower normative occupancy rates, such as 25%, means an operational loss.

We don’t have all the answers, but we do have some analytics tools that can help address some of these challenges and increase visitor engagement. Instead of facing the prospect of reduced operational revenues, for example, we first help our clients by performing computer simulations of people movement analysis, which allows museum operators to see their specific spaces being used. . In some cases, these data-driven simulations show how spaces can allow entry to more people than the mandatory occupancy rates suggest, due to the spatial situations presented by the campus or building program. The results of the analysis could also provide additional scenarios, testing the benefits of changing the spatial organization of a facility. For example, the scenario study may consider adding more entrances or exits and may consider how staff will travel or assist visitors. At the same time, we have shown how museums can improve air quality through better HVAC and filtering systems and more outdoor air supply.

A floor plan of the building with points and trend lines showing the flow of visitors and where they are most concentrated
Screenshot of an analysis of the movement of people carried out on a museum building. Credit: Buro Happold

Armed with this data, we then study the bottlenecks, bottlenecks, and pinch points that museums share, such as entrances, queue areas, and exhibition access area. We are developing unique strategies for toilets, for example, to enable their use. For catering and cafes, we’re looking at ways all food can be eaten outdoors, which works for museums with the right environmental conditions. Likewise, these cultural places may have opportunities for temporary outdoor exhibitions, if their works of art and exhibitions can be properly protected. These temporary changes have other advantages, for example by offering patrons a change of pace from the usual museum experience.

We have found that museum directors and staff are interested in pushing the boundaries in this way, although of course they also face significant financial hurdles and staff issues during the COVID-recovery period. 19. Yet the cultural leaders who think most strategically about how to reopen have found unique ways to increase their income.

Dealing with the current situation is very difficult, so a well-thought-out strategic approach is vital now, especially as institutions are facing layoffs – in some cases 30-40% of their employees. The loss of tourism is a factor that reduces the number of visitors; the loss of business travel, which was hit the hardest, also plays a role, as business tourism also drives many museum visits. We are beginning to see a consolidation and, in some extreme cases, the closure of smaller museums that play a vital role in serving communities, cities and urban neighborhoods that need it most.

But the challenges could also inspire other solutions resulting from collaboration between large and small institutions to make art more accessible and fair. One example is the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) collaboration with Charles White Elementary School, a gallery that brings art to a wider range of underserved communities in LA County. Could this decentralized approach support more communities interested in high quality shared cultural experiences? In today’s lifestyle of staying at home, people survive with the sufficiency of digital cultural experiences, but in public they can share the luxury of the same.

In any case, until 2020 and until 2021, we will continue to be involved in this learning process alongside cultural leaders. We will see variations from where we are today, but with space changes and careful planning, institutions can begin to reopen, which is the most essential first step.

The museum experience will be different from the pre-COVID era, and we will have to adapt. Finding ways to allow the public to interact with these spaces and their exhibits is crucial for survival, and using all the tools at our disposal will be essential. Cultural leaders are creative people, so we believe that by working together we will find innovative ways forward.

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Will COVID-19 change the architecture of museums? – American Alliance of Museums https://temescalartscenter.org/will-covid-19-change-the-architecture-of-museums-american-alliance-of-museums-2/ Fri, 28 Aug 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://temescalartscenter.org/will-covid-19-change-the-architecture-of-museums-american-alliance-of-museums-2/ As they design the museum buildings of the future, architects and engineers wonder what the lasting impacts of the pandemic will be. Photo credit: Buro Happold Go to beginning of article Here’s a happy thought: COVID-19 will – at some point – recede, and like pandemics of the past, it will be history, another story […]]]>

A contemporary building whose facade is extended by a large outdoor wooden pavilion.

As they design the museum buildings of the future, architects and engineers wonder what the lasting impacts of the pandemic will be. Photo credit: Buro Happold

Here’s a happy thought: COVID-19 will – at some point – recede, and like pandemics of the past, it will be history, another story to tell. But once the disease is gone, will any of the effects linger, maybe even forever? People speculated as much, foreseeing positive and negative effects on our economy, our public policies and our professional and social lives.

In the museum realm, many have asked if some of the programming and exhibition adaptations will remain, with more online availability and an increased focus on service to the local community. But what about the physical presence of the museums themselves: their buildings? Will they be redesigned and reoriented to follow suit?

To find out, we sat down with architects and engineers from two top firms: Cooper Robertson, known for projects such as the Whitney Museum and the Studio Museum in Harlem, and Buro Happold, who has contributed to projects such as the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures and the Louvre. Abu Dhabi. Here’s what they had to say about pandemic planning.


Beyond measures to create a safe environment for visitors and staff after reopening, institutions are all assessing the status quo and looking for opportunities in the event of a crisis.

Financial difficulties prompted reconsideration of planned expansions. In some cases, we are asked to consider incremental expansions that may better align with reduced funding projections. In other cases, there is a desire to wait and see the longer term impact of the virus before moving forward with future plans which may need to reflect new or changed strategic objectives.

There are questions about whether attendance will continue to be an important indicator of museum growth, which has implications for space. Financial pressures are forcing museums to think about how to use their existing spaces more efficiently and whether growth is necessarily the best way forward. Many of our recent museum planning projects have focused on existing spaces, finding ways to correct mistakes made in previous expansions. At the same time, the emphasis on online content has allowed museums to reach wider and wider audiences than is usually possible in their physical space. Online engagement is expected to, among other benefits, encourage more and more diverse in-person visits over the long term.

Work-from-home arrangements have clear benefits for the environment and working life. More flexible working arrangements are likely to remain and should reduce the need for offices and workspaces for on-site staff. Some of these existing spaces could be repurposed, while the need for expanded staff spaces could decrease.

There is greater interest in strengthening ties to the outdoors with spaces for art exhibition, programs and meals. This ties into a broader trend to emphasize spaces that promote a sense of health and well-being.

A building whose facade extends into an outdoor pavilion
Grace Farms in New Canaan, Connecticut. Photo credit: Buro Happold

There are concerns about how gathering spaces – classrooms, theaters and event spaces – can continue to provide important sources of revenue for museums while social distancing remains necessary. Museums have sought new sponsorships that can support the use of gathering spaces for temporary artist programs or for audienceless or socially distanced performances that are streamed online, although revenue generation opportunities for these activities seem limited. Spaces with the inherent flexibility to transform from conference or event space to spaces for art or other uses can better respond to the future, including unexpected changes such as those imposed by COVID-19.

In addition to their responses to COVID-19, social justice movements have compelled museums to prioritize how they can better reflect and engage with their communities. These actions could alter the balance of space requirements. Although already present in many recent museum expansions, physical spaces will emphasize a greater sense of welcome and community, which can be expressed by emphasizing flexible public spaces, transparency between interior and exterior and the principles of universal design.

A lobby with a round design and floor-to-ceiling glass walls
The Gateway Arch Museum in St. Louis. Photo credit: Nic Lehoux

We have seen many varied ideas for reopening museums, including some from cultural and entertainment venues like the Barbican Center in London. These ideas offer potential avenues for museums that go beyond the current baseline, which typically involves following state orders and guidelines and can lead to very generic solutions: reduced occupancy, for example, as well as timed tickets, timed outings and contactless tours everywhere. These offer some level of short-term risk reduction, but they are figuratively and literally sanitized, creating a much more sterile cultural experience. Additionally, most museums offer no food and, in many cases, no toilets or trash cans, and no group tours, which also highlights the existential challenges resulting from a purely one-to-one approach. short term: cafes and gift shops are vital sources of income for many institutions, for example. How many can survive without these spaces?

At Buro Happold, our perspective is to work with museums to go beyond. We ask, “How can we provide additional and different ways to help facilities reopen, and not just follow prescriptive guidelines? Indeed, for many museums (some of which are our clients), operating at lower normative occupancy rates, such as 25%, means operating with an operational loss.

We don’t have all the answers, but we do have some analytics tools that can help address some of these challenges and increase visitor engagement. Instead of facing the prospect of reduced operational revenue, for example, we first help our clients by performing computer simulations of people movement analysis, which allows museum operators to see their spaces specific in use. In some cases, these data-driven simulations show how spaces can allow entry to more people than mandatory occupancy rates suggest, due to the spatial situations presented by the campus or building program. The results of the analysis could also provide additional scenarios, testing the benefits of modifying the spatial organization of a facility. For example, the scenario study might consider adding more entrances or exits and may consider how staff will move or assist visitors. In concert with this, we have shown how museums can improve air quality with better HVAC and better filtering and more outside air intake.

A floor plan of the building with dots and trend lines showing the flow of visitors and where they are most concentrated
Screenshot of a people movement analysis performed in a museum building. 1 credit

Armed with this data, we then investigate the choke points, bottlenecks, and pinch points that museums share, such as entrances, queuing areas, and exhibit access area. We develop unique strategies for toilets, for example, to enable their use. For catering and cafes, we are looking at ways to consume all food outdoors, which works for museums with the right environmental conditions. Likewise, these cultural venues may have opportunities for temporary outdoor exhibitions, if their works of art and exhibits can be properly protected. These temporary modifications have other advantages, for example by offering users a change of pace from the usual museum experience.

We have found that museum directors and staff want to push the envelope in this way, although they also face significant financial hurdles and staffing issues during the COVID-19 recovery period. Yet the cultural leaders who think most strategically about how to reopen have found unique ways to increase their income.

Dealing with the current situation is very difficult, which is why a well-thought-out strategic approach is vital now, especially as institutions face layoffs – in some cases, 30-40% of their employees. The loss of tourism is a factor that reduces visitation; the loss of business travel, which has been most affected, also plays a role, as business tourism also drives many museum visits. We are beginning to see the consolidation and, in some extreme cases, the closure of small museums that play a vital role in serving the communities, cities and neighborhoods that need them most.

But the challenges could also inspire other solutions that come from collaboration between large and small institutions to make art more accessible and equitable. One example is the Los Angeles County Museum of Art’s (LACMA) collaboration with Charles White Elementary School, a gallery that brings art to a wider range of underserved communities in LA County. Could this decentralized approach support more communities interested in high quality shared cultural experiences? In today’s stay-at-home lifestyle, people survive on the sufficiency of digital cultural experiences, but in public they can share the luxury of the same.

In any case, until 2020 and until 2021, we will continue to be involved in this learning process alongside cultural leaders. We will see variations from the current situation, but with space modifications and careful planning, institutions can begin to reopen, which is the most essential first step.

The museum experience will be different from the pre-COVID era, and we will have to adapt. Finding ways to allow the public to interact with these spaces and their exhibits is crucial for survival, and using all the tools at our disposal will be essential. Cultural leaders are creative people, so we believe that by working together we will find innovative ways.

Skip related stories to continue reading the article

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A year of museum architecture https://temescalartscenter.org/a-year-of-museum-architecture-2/ Fri, 02 Aug 2019 07:00:00 +0000 https://temescalartscenter.org/a-year-of-museum-architecture-2/ [ad_1] Over the past year, major museums have opened, such as the V&A Dundee in Scotland by Kengo Kuma, the Desert Rose National Museum of Qatar by Jean Nouvel and the James Simon Galerie in Berlin by David Chipperfield. Long-awaited projects that have been made famous not only by their design by big names on […]]]>


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Over the past year, major museums have opened, such as the V&A Dundee in Scotland by Kengo Kuma, the Desert Rose National Museum of Qatar by Jean Nouvel and the James Simon Galerie in Berlin by David Chipperfield. Long-awaited projects that have been made famous not only by their design by big names on the international architectural scene, or their inclusion in major international competitions, but also by their status as emblematic buildings that could create the “Bilbao effect” in other cities. 2019 also marks an important anniversary, namely the 60th anniversary of the Guggenheim Museum in New York, a true icon of world architecture designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. On the Made in Italy side, the last few months have seen the opening of Museum of Italian Design at the Triennale di Milano and the Iris Ceramica Group Museum, the only example of a company museum dedicated to ceramic wall tiles in Italy.
Open on May 23, 2019, Iris Ceramica Group Museum was designed by Zone 17 architecture office as part of the redevelopment of the historic headquarters of the holding company in Fiorano Modenese. The museum is part of the Museimpresa network, the Italian association of business museums and archives, and tells the story of a great Italian company, one of values ​​and progress that does an excellent job of representing the industrious district of ceramics for architecture, an important Made in Italy.

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York, the first museum in the network of Guggenheim museums scattered around the world is approaching its sixtieth birthday, but it would be unfair not to add that it does not look like it. A true masterpiece of world architecture designed by the architect Frank Lloyd Wright and opened posthumously on October 21, 1959, a few months after the death of its creator and 10 years after that of the client who commissioned it, Solomon R. Guggenheim. A series of events and exhibitions spread throughout the year celebrate the sixty years of this iconic giant of modern architecture. An architecture that was not immediately praised, but which has stood the test of time by continuing to be a source of inspiration for entire generations of architects.

September 15, V&A Dundee, Scotland’s premier design museum, will celebrate its first year since opening its doors. An iconic building inspired by the Scottish cliffs, according to its designer, the Japanese architect Kengo Kuma. The design derives its iconic strength from the site itself, having been built in a unique location between the water and the city, and representing the restoration of the relationship between Dundee and its maritime history, which is linked to the River Tay.

On March 28, the new Qatar National Museum, designed by the architect Jean Nouvel, has been officially opened. A building inspired by the desert rose, a natural mineral formation typical of the region of Qatar. The new building surrounds the historic palace of Sheikh Abdullah bin Jassim Al Thani, a national monument and one of the most beloved symbols of the people of Qatar, which becomes the final and culminating element of an immersive journey through the exhibition. The museum allows visitors to travel through the history of Qatar, through a successful combination of architectural space and experiences that engage the senses with music, poetry, oral histories and evocative aromas.

July 13, 2019 James Simon Gallery, conceived by David Chipperfield Architects, was inaugurated. An architecture that plays a dual role, the building serves as the central entrance to Berlin’s Museum Island (Museumsinsel) and fulfills a series of functions that are necessary for the entire museum system of the island. As a place, it reorganizes the Museum Island’s relationship with the city and accessibility, reconnecting threads interrupted by the destruction of WWII and creating new spatial connections and relationships.

(Agnese Bifulco)

Pictures:
(1, 9,10) The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York: © The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York photo by David Heald
(2-6) Museo Storico Iris Ceramica Group © Iris Ceramica Group
(7-8) Museo del Design Italiano Milano – Italia: © Triennale di Milano, photo by Gianluca Di Ioia
(11-17) V&A Dundee: © V&A Dundee photo by Hufton + Crow
(18-23) National Museum of Qatar, Doha Qatar: © National Museum of Qatar, photo by Iwan Baan
(24-25) James Simon Galerie Berlin: © David Chipperfield Architects, photo by Simon Menges

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Atelier Periferica: The open museum [Architecture + SelfConstruction] https://temescalartscenter.org/atelier-periferica-the-open-museum-architecture-selfconstruction/ Mon, 18 Mar 2019 07:00:00 +0000 https://temescalartscenter.org/atelier-periferica-the-open-museum-architecture-selfconstruction/ [ad_1] Atelier Periferica: The open museum [Architecture + SelfConstruction] Official poster To share To share Facebook Twitter Pinterest WhatsApp Mail Or https://www.archdaily.com/913422/periferica-workshop-the-open-museum-architecture-plus-selfconstruction Periferica is an international festival of urban regeneration that will take place in Mazara del Vallo, Sicily, from August 1 to 10, 2019. Every year, Periferica brings together associations, universities and companies to […]]]>


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Atelier Periferica: The open museum [Architecture + SelfConstruction]

Periferica is an international festival of urban regeneration that will take place in Mazara del Vallo, Sicily, from August 1 to 10, 2019. Every year, Periferica brings together associations, universities and companies to rethink a disused neighborhood with students, creatives and residents, through a program of workshops and events. Since 2013, more than 300 students from different parts of Europe have participated.

For the sixth edition – the open museum, ancient heritage for new users – participants will be invited to design new solutions for Evocava, the future Mazara cave museum, moving from the analysis phase to the design and development phases. self-production. The event will take place in the same project area which, for 10 days, will become a micro-village where participants can study, socialize, participate in construction activities and get in touch with the community.

You can apply as a participant or tutor in one of the 3 workshops before May 30 (or while places are exhausted). The workshops will last 10 days, alternating training, excursions and activities, and will include reception, meals, and a certificate of participation (3cfu).

Applicants must first apply through the appropriate form.

application form: bit.ly/PerifericaF18_Form
official site: perifericaproject.org/festival-19-eng
contacts: atelier@perifericaproject.org
Application deadline May 30, 2019

Download the information about this competition here.

This call for applications was submitted by an ArchDaily user. If you wish to submit a competition, a call for applications or any other architectural “opportunity”, please use our “Submit a call for applications” form. The opinions expressed in advertisements submitted by ArchDaily users do not necessarily reflect the views of ArchDaily.


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New study suggests why museum architecture is so curvy, and it’s not because visitors like it so https://temescalartscenter.org/new-study-suggests-why-museum-architecture-is-so-curvy-and-its-not-because-visitors-like-it-so/ Mon, 25 Feb 2019 08:00:00 +0000 https://temescalartscenter.org/new-study-suggests-why-museum-architecture-is-so-curvy-and-its-not-because-visitors-like-it-so/ [ad_1] In 1959 Frank Lloyd Wright defended his design for the Guggenheim Museum from the charge that his curved architecture would subjugate the paintings inside: “Rather, it was to make building and painting a beautiful unbroken symphony. like the art world never before. Today, a curvilinear “symphony” is the hallmark of many museums designed by […]]]>


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In 1959 Frank Lloyd Wright defended his design for the Guggenheim Museum from the charge that his curved architecture would subjugate the paintings inside: “Rather, it was to make building and painting a beautiful unbroken symphony. like the art world never before.

Today, a curvilinear “symphony” is the hallmark of many museums designed by starch makers: the baroque museum in Puebla (designed by Toyo Ito), the Guggenheim Bilbao (Gehry), the Heydar Aliyev center in Baku (Zaha Hadid), the Louis Vuitton Foundation (Gehry) and the Quadracci Pavilion at the Milwaukee Art Museum (Santiago Calatrava), to name a few.

But is the public as charmed by all these curved, arched, inclined surfaces as the architects who designed them are? Not according to a new study published in the journal Psychology of aesthetics, creativity and the arts, who compared the architectural preferences of non-experts to those of professional architects and designers.

The Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain. Photo by Ian West / PA, Images via Getty Images.

When asked to compare four images of curvilinear rooms with four rectilinear, the non-experts – in this case a group of 71 college students who have never studied architecture, interior design or history of art – showed no preference for one over the other. But those who identified themselves as professional architects or designers have always found curvilinear spaces more beautiful.

The researchers suggest that these taste differences could be the result of architectural training programs. “[A]among experts, greater sensitivity to contours could be a function of negative associations with rectilinear contours, refined by professional practice and training, ”they write.

But a second part of the study adds an intriguing paradox to the results.

The researchers then asked the participants how likely they would be to enter each of the rectilinear and curvilinear spaces. And it turns out that the non-experts were Following likely to opt for curved rooms than experts were. “The reason for this difference is unclear,” say the researchers.

They hypothesize, however, that this could be summed up as another effect of the training: even though the experts may have “sharpened” their eyes to appreciate the spaces at the level of purely aesthetic form, they also refrained from doing so. other types of positive associations. ordinary people have a curvy architecture.

What is that? The article argued that “we owe our preference for curvature to a coupling between this perceptual characteristic (ie the curved configuration) and the sensorimotor processes adapted to it in the brain”. That is, the curves trigger an association with the sensation of movement.

“Perhaps when asked to make an entry-exit decision, the functionality or usability of a space becomes the relevant framework of choice for non-expert participants,” the researchers write. “Experts can be trained to visualize images of architectural spaces without passion and be less subject to the implicit behavioral biases rendered by their visual characteristics.”

So, the real result of the study may be that architects do not feel the appeal of their own designs.

The Quadracci Pavilion at the Milwaukee Art Museum in Milwaukee. Photo by Jeff Greenberg / UIG via Getty Images.

The Quadracci Pavilion at the Milwaukee Art Museum in Milwaukee. Photo by Jeff Greenberg / UIG via Getty Images.

The study is just the latest in a large body of ongoing research into the preferences of the rectilinear design over the curvilinear design. Previous studies have shown that infants look at round shapes longer than angular shapes. Monkeys have also shown a preference for curved outlines. And it has been found that travelers favor rounded architecture at airports. But this study is rare in its focus on the role that expertise plays in these judgments.

In short, the public may not necessarily agree with Gehry that the Guggenheim is more of a “beautiful symphony” than, say, the square brutalism of the Met Breuer. But, for reasons we’ll have to leave for future study for now, they’re even more inclined to go inside.

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