Home Museum architecture Atelier Periferica: The open museum [Architecture + SelfConstruction]

Atelier Periferica: The open museum [Architecture + SelfConstruction]

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Atelier Periferica: The open museum [Architecture + SelfConstruction]

Atelier Periferica: The open museum [Architecture + SelfConstruction]

Periferica is an international festival of urban regeneration that will take place in Mazara del Vallo, Sicily, from August 1 to 10, 2019. Every year, Periferica brings together associations, universities and companies to rethink a disused neighborhood with students, creatives and residents, through a program of workshops and events. Since 2013, more than 300 students from different parts of Europe have participated.

For the sixth edition – the open museum, ancient heritage for new users – participants will be invited to design new solutions for Evocava, the future Mazara cave museum, moving from the analysis phase to the design and development phases. self-production. The event will take place in the same project area which, for 10 days, will become a micro-village where participants can study, socialize, participate in construction activities and get in touch with the community.

You can apply as a participant or tutor in one of the 3 workshops before May 30 (or while places are exhausted). The workshops will last 10 days, alternating training, excursions and activities, and will include reception, meals, and a certificate of participation (3cfu).

Applicants must first apply through the appropriate form.

application form: bit.ly/PerifericaF18_Form
official site: perifericaproject.org/festival-19-eng
contacts: [email protected]
Application deadline May 30, 2019

Download the information about this competition here.

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